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An Intent So Focused: Understanding Asperger Syndrome
... From day one, Karen Hull and her husband, Gregory, realized something was different about their son Brian. "He hardly ever slept and didn’t cry, except when he had temper tantrums." The todd...
Source: Cleveland Clinic

Autism
... What is autism? Autism it is a developmental disorder that is likely caused by some impairment of the brain. It usually appears by age two, although it may not be diagnosed until somewhat later. Autis...
Source: Cleveland Clinic

Information Resources Online: Autism & Related Disorders
... General autism resources (research, information, treatment): Tony Attwood’s site for parents and professionals http://www.tonyattwood.com.au/ OASIS (Asperger''s related information) http://www.udel.ed...
Source: Cleveland Clinic

Asperger Syndrome Information Page
... Asperger syndrome (AS) is a developmental disorder.  It is an autism spectrum disorder (ASD), one of a distinct group of neurological conditions characterized by a greater or lesser degree of imp...
Source: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Autism Information Page
... Autism (sometimes called “classical autism”) is the most common condition in a group of developmental disorders known as the autism spectrum disorders (ASDs).   Other ASDs includ...
Source: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Autism and Communication
... The brain disorder autism begins in early childhood and persists throughout adulthood affecting three crucial areas of development: verbal and nonverbal communication, social interaction, and creative...
Source: National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders

Medications
... This booklet is designed to help mental health patients and their families understand how and why medications can be used as part of the treatment of mental health problems. It is important for you to...
Source: National Institute of Mental Health

The Numbers Count
... Mental Disorders in America Mental disorders are common in the United States and internationally. An estimated 22.1 percent of Americans ages 18 and older—about 1 in 5 adults—suffer from a diagnos...
Source: National Institute of Mental Health

Gene Hunting
... Many years of research have demonstrated that vulnerability to mental illnesses—such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, early-onset depression, anxiety disorders, autism, and attention deficit hype...
Source: National Institute of Mental Health

Autism Fact Sheet
... Autism (sometimes called “classical autism”) is the most common condition in a group of developmental disorders known as the autism spectrum disorders (ASDs).   Autism is charact...
Source: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Autism Spectrum Disorders (Pervasive Developmental Disorders)
... Not until the middle of the twentieth century was there a name for a disorder that now appears to affect an estimated one of every five hundred children, a disorder that causes disruption in families ...
Source: National Institute of Mental Health

Autism Spectrum Disorders Research at the National Institute of Mental Health
... Autism spectrum disorders (ASD), a broad continuum of brain illnesses that includes Asperger's syndrome, share common genetic roots and essential clinical and behavioral features, although they di...
Source: National Institute of Mental Health

Unraveling Autism
... Autism, a brain disorder that affects 1 to 2 in 1,000 Americans,1 too often results in a lifetime of impaired thinking, feeling and social functioning—our most uniquely human attributes. Autism typi...
Source: National Institute of Mental Health

   

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