Relate

 

Chicken Pox; Varicella-Zoster Virus 

Chicken pox, also spelled chickenpox, is a common childhood disease caused by the varicella-zoster virus (VZV), also known as human herpes virus 3 (HHV-3), one of the eight herpesviruses known to affect humans. It is characterized by a fever followed by itchy raw pox or open sores.


Chickenpox Vaccine as related to Chickenpox


  • Chickenpox Vaccination | What You Should Know | CDC
    age-appropriate chickenpox vaccination preschool-age children (age 12 months through 3 years): 1 dose school-age... preschool-age children (age 12 months through 3 years): 1 dose school-age children, adolescents, adults: 2 doses or other evidence of immunity against chickenpox.

  • Chickenpox (Varicella) Vaccine: Schedule and Side Effects

    https://www.webmd.com/children/vaccines/chickenpox-varicella-vaccine

    What Is the Chickenpox Vaccine? The chickenpox vaccine is a shot that can protect nearly anyone who receives the vaccine from catching chickenpox. It's also called the varicella vaccine, because...

  • Vaccine (Shot) for Chickenpox (Varicella) | CDC

    https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/parents/diseases/varicella.html

    The chickenpox shot is safe. The chickenpox shot is very safe, and it is effective at protecting against chickenpox. Vaccines, like a medicine, can have side effects. These are usually mild and go away on their own.

  • Varicella vaccine - Wikipedia
    The chickenpox vaccine is also known as the varicella vaccine because varicella zoster is the virus that causes the disease. The vaccine was introduced to …

  • Chickenpox (Varicella) | Vaccines
    Chickenpox used to be very common in the United States. But the good news is that the vaccine has greatly reduced the number of people who get it. Two doses of the chickenpox vaccine are over 90% effective at preventing it. Most people who get the vaccine don’t get chickenpox — and those who do usually get a much milder version of the disease.

  • Adult Chickenpox (Varicella) Vaccine Guidelines
    Vaccination is the best way to prevent chickenpox. A chickenpox vaccine has been available in the U.S. since 1995 and is easy to get from a doctor or a public health clinic. The chickenpox vaccine...

  • Chickenpox (Varicella) | History of Vaccines

    https://www.historyofvaccines.org/content/articles/chickenpox-varicella

    The chickenpox vaccine is a live, attenuated vaccine and is not recommended for people with weakened immune systems. It is available as a single vaccine, and it is also available as part of the MMRV vaccine (measles, mumps, rubella, and varicella vaccine). The chickenpox vaccine was added to the childhood immunization schedule in 1995.

  • Vaccine Information Statement | Chickenpox | Varicella ...
    Varicella vaccine can prevent chickenpox. Chickenpox can cause an itchy rash that usually lasts about a week. It can also cause fever, tiredness, loss of appetite, and headache. It can lead to skin infections, pneumonia, inflammation of the blood vessels, and swelling of the brain and/or spinal cord covering, and infections of the bloodstream, bone, or joints.