Clinical Trial: Dietary Antioxidants and Atherosclerosis

This study has been completed.

Sponsored by: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)
Information provided by: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)

Purpose

To examine the role of dietary antioxidants in the etiology of atherosclerosis in both sexes and in whites and Blacks.

Condition
Atherosclerosis
Cardiovascular Diseases
Heart Diseases
Carotid Stenosis

MedlinePlus related topics:  Carotid Artery Disease;   Heart Diseases;   Heart Diseases--Prevention;   Vascular Diseases

Study Type: Observational
Study Design: Natural History

Further Study Details: 

Study start: July 1992;  Study completion: June 1995

BACKGROUND: Atherosclerosis is this nation's leading cause of death for males and females, and Blacks and whites. There is mounting evidence that the oxidation of blood low density lipoproteins (LDL) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of this disease. LDL oxidation can be prevented by several dietary antioxidants, in particular, vitamin C, vitamin E, and beta-carotene. There is preliminary evidence that dietary antioxidants may slow the natural history of atherosclerosis in humans. Until now studies in this area have included predominantly white males with symptomatic disease.

DESIGN NARRATIVE: The case-control study used data collected in ARIC to test the hypothesis that individuals in the lowest quintile of vitamin C, vitamin E and carotenoid consumption were at higher risk of asymptomatic atherosclerosis than those consuming greater amounts. Antioxidant intake was assessed by a validated food frequency questionnaire and a diet supplement survey. Cases were those with asymptomatic carotid artery atherosclerosis as determined by B-mode ultrasonography. Controls were those without evidence of carotid artery atherosclerosis. Secondary analyses determined which sex-race subgroups were at particular risk due to low antioxidant consumption.

Eligibility

Genders Eligible for Study:  Male

Criteria

No eligibility criteria

More Information

Publications

Kritchevsky SB, Shimakawa T, Tell GS, Dennis B, Carpenter M, Eckfeldt JH, Peacher-Ryan H, Heiss G. Dietary antioxidants and carotid artery wall thickness. The ARIC Study. Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study. Circulation. 1995 Oct 15;92(8):2142-50.

Kritchevsky SB, Tell GS, Shimakawa T, Dennis B, Li R, Kohlmeier L, Steere E, Heiss G. Provitamin A carotenoid intake and carotid artery plaques: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study. Am J Clin Nutr. 1998 Sep;68(3):726-33.

Study ID Numbers:  4330
Record last reviewed:  June 2000
Last Updated:  October 13, 2004
Record first received:  May 25, 2000
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:  NCT00005412
Health Authority: United States: Federal Government
ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on 2005-04-08


Source: ClinicalTrials.gov
Cache Date: April 9, 2005

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