Congestive heart failure (CHF), also called congestive cardiac failure (CCF) or just heart failure, is a condition that can result from any structural or functional cardiac disorder that impairs the ability of the heart to fill with or pump a sufficient amount of blood throughout the body. It is not to be confused with "cessation of heartbeat", which is known as asystole, or with cardiac arrest, which is the cessation of normal cardiac function in the face of heart disease. Because not all ...
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How Heart Failure is Diagnosed
... To diagnose heart failure, your doctor will first ask you questions about your symptoms and medical history. Your doctor will want to know: If you have any other health conditions such as diabetes, ki...
Source: Cleveland Clinic

Signs and symptoms
... Heart failure typically doesn''t occur suddenly. It develops slowly, over time. It''s usually a chronic, long-term condition. The first and often only symptom may be shortness of breath. Signs and sym...
Source: MayoClinic

Causes
... Your circulatory system includes arteries and veins. Arteries deliver oxygen-rich blood to the organs and tissues of your body. Veins bring oxygen-poor blood back to your heart to be cycled through yo...
Source: MayoClinic

Risk factors
... A single risk factor may be sufficient to cause heart failure, but a combination of factors dramatically increases the risk. Risk factors include: Age. Advanced age adds to the potential impact of any...
Source: MayoClinic

When to seek medical advice
... See your doctor if you experience any of the signs or symptoms associated with heart failure. Often signs and symptoms of heart failure initiate an emergency room visit, where the condition may first ...
Source: MayoClinic

Screening and diagnosis
... In many cases, doctors diagnose heart failure by taking a careful medical history and performing a physical examination. Your doctor will also check for the presence of risk factors such as high blood...
Source: MayoClinic

   

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