Definitions

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  • A Partnership for Health: Minorities &
  • A secondary infection of the blisters may occur.
  • A-hydroCort
  • A-Spas S/L
  • A/B Otic Drops
  • A/G Ratio
  • A/T/S
  • A1C
    Airman First Class is the third lowest enlisted rank in the U.S. Air Force, just above Airman and below Senior Airman. It is abbreviated A1C.
  • A33 monoclonal antibody -
    A type of monoclonal antibody used in cancer detection or therapy. Monoclonal antibodies are laboratory-produced substances that can locate and bind to cancer cells.
  • AAA - Feeds
  • AAA Topics
  • AAP -
    Alanine aminopeptidase. An enzyme that is used as a biomarker to detect damage to the kidneys, and that may be used to help diagnose certain kidney disorders. It is found at high levels in the urine when there are kidney problems.
  • Aarskog syndrome
    Aarskog-Scott syndrome is an inherited disease characterized by short stature, facial abnormalities, skeletal and genital anomalies.
  • Aase syndrome
    Aase syndrome or Aase-Smith syndrome is a rare inherited disorder characterized by anemia with some joint and skeletal deformities. ...
  • Ab Exercises
  • Ab Toners
  • Abacavir
    Abacavir (ABC) is a nucleoside analog reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) used to treat HIV and AIDS. ...
  • Abacavir Oral Solution
  • Abacavir, Zidovudine and Lamivudine
  • abarelix - a-ba-REL-iks
    A drug used to reduce the amount of testosterone made in patients with advanced symptomatic prostate cancer for which no other treatment options are available. It belongs to the family of drugs called gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonists. Also called Plenaxis.
  • ABCD rating -
    A staging system for prostate cancer that uses ABCD. “A” and “B” refer to cancer that is confined to the prostate. “C” refers to cancer that has grown out of the prostate but has not spread to lymph nodes or other places in the body. “D” refers to cancer that has spread to lymph nodes or to other places in the body. Also called the Jewett staging system or the Whitmore-Jewett staging system.
  • Abciximab Injection
  • abdomen - AB-do-men
    The area of the body that contains the pancreas, stomach, intestines, liver, gallbladder, and other organs.
  • abdominal -
    Having to do with the abdomen, which is the part of the body between the chest and the hips that contains the pancreas, stomach, intestines, liver, gallbladder, and other organs.
  • Abdominal aortic aneurysm
    Abdominal aortic aneurysm, also written as AAA and often pronounced 'triple-A', is a localized dilatation of the abdominal aorta, that exceeds the normal diameter by more than 50%. The normal diameter of the infrarenal aorta is 2 cm. ...
  • Abdominal Cramps
    Cramps, or spasms with acute pain, in the region of the stomach and bowels.
  • Abdominal Hernia
    A hernia is a of a tissue, structure, or part of an organ through the muscle tissue or the membrane by which it is normally contained. ...
  • Abdominal Perineal Resection
  • Abdominal Wall Inflammation
  • abdominoperineal resection -
    Surgery to remove the anus, the rectum, and part of the sigmoid colon through an incision made in the abdomen. The end of the intestine is attached to an opening in the surface of the abdomen and body waste is collected in a disposable bag outside of the body. This opening is called a colostomy. Lymph nodes that contain cancer may also be removed during this operation.
  • Abdominoplasty
    Abdominoplasty or "tummy tuck" is a cosmetic surgery procedure to reshape and firm the abdomen. It involves the removal of excess skin and fat from the middle and lower abdomen in order to tighten the muscles of the abdominal wall. This type of surgery is usually sought by women (who are not considering having children) and individuals who have abdominal fat deposits which do not respond well to diet and exercise.
  • Abelcet
    Amphotericin B (Fungilin®, Fungizone®, Abelcet®, AmBisome®, Amphocil®) is a polyene antimycotic drug, used intravenously in systemic fungal infections. It was originally extracted from Streptomyces nodosus fungi.
  • ABI-007 -
    A substance that is being studied in the treatment of cancer. It is a special form of the anticancer drug paclitaxel that may have fewer side effects and may be able to be given in higher doses. It belongs to the families of drugs called mitotic inhibitors and taxanes.
  • ablation -
    In medicine, the removal or destruction of a body part or tissue or its function. Ablation may be performed by surgery, hormones, drugs, radiofrequency, heat, or other methods.
  • abnormal -
    Not normal. In referring to a lesion or growth, may be cancerous or premalignant (likely to become cancer).
  • Abnormal connection between the esophagus and aorta (aortoesophageal fistula)
  • Abnormal connections between abdominal organs or between these organs and the skin surface
  • Abnormal connections within the heart
  • Abnormal female external genitals (internal organs are normal)
  • Abnormal heart rhythm (arrhythmia)
  • Abnormal heart rhythms
  • Abnormal movements, such as tears when laughing or salivation at the wrong times (synkinesis)
  • ABO Blood Groups
    A blood type is a description of an individual's characteristics of red blood cells due to substances (carbohydrates and proteins) on the cell membrane. The two most important classifications to describe blood types in humans are ABO and the Rhesus factor (Rh factor). There are 46 other known antigens, most of which are much rarer than ABO and Rh. ...
  • ABO incompatibility
    In ABO hemolytic disease of the newborn (also known as ABO HDN) maternal IgG antibodies with specificity for the ABO blood group system pass ...
  • Abortion - elective or therapeutic
  • About Your Medicines
  • Abs Diet
  • abscess -
    An enclosed collection of pus in tissues, organs, or confined spaces in the body. An abscess is a sign of infection and is usually swollen and inflamed.
  • Abscess formation
    A cavity is formed containing pus, an opaque liquid containing dead white blood cells and bacteria with general debris from destroyed cells.
  • Absence seizure
    In medicine, there are many kinds of generalized seizures. In absence seizures, the person may appear to be staring into space and/or have jerking or twitching muscles. These seizures are sometimes referred to as petit mal seizures, which is an older term. These periods last for seconds, or even tens of seconds. They sometimes move from one location to another without any purpose.
  • Absent pulmonary valve
  • ABT-510 -
    A substance that is being studied in the treatment of cancer. It belongs to the family of drugs called angiogenesis inhibitors.
  • ABT-751 -
    A substance that is being studied in the treatment of cancer. It belongs to the family of drugs called sulfonamides.
  • Abuse
    Abuse is a general term for the misuse of a person or thing, causing harm to the person or thing, to the abuser, or to someone else. Abuse can be something as simple as damaging a piece of equipment through using it the wrong way, or as serious as severe maltreatment of a person. Abuse may be direct and overt, or may be disguised and covert.
  • Abuse by an over-stressed caregiver
  • Abuta
  • ABX-EGF -
    A type of monoclonal antibody being studied in the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. Monoclonal antibodies are laboratory-produced substances that can locate and bind to cancer cells.
  • Acalculous Cholecystitis
  • Acanthopanax senticosus
  • Acanthosis Nigricans
    Acanthosis nigricans is a brown to black, poorly defined, velvety hyperpigmentation of the skin, usually present in the posterior and lateral folds of the neck, the axilla, groin, umbilicus, and other areas.
  • Acarbose
    Acarbose is a drug used to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus. It is sold in Europe under the brand name Glucobay® (Bayer AG), in North America as Precose® (Bayer AG), and in Canada as Prandase® (Bayer AG). It is an inhibitor of alpha glucosidase, an enteric enzyme that releases glucose from larger carbohydrates. The main side-effect is loose stool or diarrhea, which limits its use. It is a moderately effective anti-diabetic drug.
  • accelerated phase - ak-SEL-er-ay-ted
    Refers to chronic myelogenous leukemia that is progressing. The number of immature, abnormal white blood cells in the bone marrow and blood is higher than in the chronic phase but not as high as in the blast phase.
  • Accident Prevention
    avoidance of the occurrence of an accident. Reduction of its consequences if it does occur, such as control of personal or machine performance.
  • Accidents
    An accident is something going wrong unexpectedly. Physical examples include an unavoidable collision (including a person or object falling by chance). The term is also loosely applied to mean any undesirable outcome, even if it could have been avoided, such as getting injured by touching something sharp, hot, electrically live, ingesting poisons, or other injuries caused by lack of ordinary precautions.
  • Accubron Syrup
  • Accurbron
  • Accuretic
  • ACE
    The acronym ACE, depending on context, can refer to: *Accumulated Cyclone Energy, a measure of the activity of Atlantic hurricane seasons*Adaptive Communication Environment, an open-source class framework*Advanced Computing Environment, a defunct initiative to define a "new PC" based on MIPS CPU's instead of Intel x86*Advanced Composition Explorer, a NASA satellite*Air Combat Emulator, a 1980s computer game for the Commodore 64 home computer*Altamont Commuter Express, a commuter train ...
  • ACE inhibitor -
    Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor. A type of drug that is used to lower blood pressure. ACE inhibitors belong to the family of drugs called antihypertensives.
  • ACE Inhibitors
    ACE inhibitors, or inhibitors of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme, are a group of pharmaceuticals that are used primarily in treatment of hypertension and congestive heart failure, in most cases as the drugs of first choice.
  • Acebutolol
    generic name: acebutolol BRAND name: SECTRAL DRUG CLASS AND MECHANISM: Acebutolol is a beta-adrenergic (sympathetic) blocking agent. By blocking the action of the sympathetic nervous system on the heart More Detail Info ...
  • Acephen Suppositories
  • Aceta with Codeine
  • acetaminophen -
    A drug that reduces pain and fever (but not inflammation). It belongs to the family of drugs called analgesics.
  • Acetaminophen and Aspirin and Caffeine powder
  • Acetaminophen and Butalbital
    What is acetaminophen and butalbital? Acetaminophen is a pain reliever and a fever reducer. Butalbital is in a class of drugs called barbiturates that slow down your central nervous system (brain and nerve impulses) causing relaxation. The combination, acetaminophen and butalbital, is used to treat tension (or muscle contraction) headaches. The PDR reference is here. acetaminophen and caffeine
  • Acetaminophen and Codeine
  • Acetaminophen and Codeine Oral Solution
  • Acetaminophen and Hydrocodone
    What is acetaminophen and hydrocodone? Hydrocodone (related to codeine) is in a class of drugs called narcotic analgesics. It relieves pain. Acetaminophen is a less potent pain reliever that increases the effects of hydrocodone. Together, acetaminophen and hydrocodone are used to relieve moderate-to-severe pain. The PDR reference is here. acetaminophen and oxycodone
  • Acetaminophen and Hydrocodone Oral Solution
  • Acetaminophen and Oxycodone
  • Acetaminophen and Oxycodone Oral Solution
  • Acetaminophen and Propoxyphene
  • Acetaminophen and Pseudoephedrine
    What is acetaminophen and pseudoephedrine? Acetaminophen is a pain reliever and a fever reducer. It is used to treat many conditions, such as headache, muscle aches, arthritis, backache, toothaches, colds, and fevers. Pseudoephedrine is a decongestant. It constricts (shrinks) blood vessels (veins and arteries). This reduces the blood flow to certain areas, which decreases swelling and allows nasal and respiratory (breathing) passages to open up. ...
  • Acetaminophen Oral Suspension or Syrup
  • Acetaminophen Suppositories
  • Acetaminophen, Aspirin, Caffeine Oral
  • Acetaminophen, Butalbital, and Caffeine
  • Acetaminophen, Butalbital, Caffeine and Codeine
  • Acetaminophen-containing Medications
  • Acetasol HC
  • Acetazolamide
    Acetazolamide, sold under the trade name Diamox®, is a carbonic anhydrase inhibitor that is used to treat glaucoma, epileptic seizures, benign intracranial hypertension and altitude sickness. For glaucoma sufferers, the drug decreases fluid formation around the eye resulting in lower internal pressure on the eye. Acetazolamide can only be obtained by prescription and is available as a generic drug.
  • Acetazolamide Injection
  • Acetazolamide Sustained-Release
  • Acetic Acid and Hydrocortisone Eardrops
  • Acetic Acid, Ricinoleic Acid and Oxyquinoline Vaginal
  • Acetohexamide
    An oral medicine used to treat type 2 diabetes. It lowers blood glucose by helping the pancreas make more insulin and by helping the body better use the insulin it makes. Belongs to the class of medicines call sulfonylureas. Brand name: Dymelor)
  • Acetyl-L-Carnitine
    Acetyl-L-carnitine (ALCAR) is an acetylated form of L-carnitine, which is far superior to normal L-carnitine in terms of bioavailability. ALCAR is absorbed by the gastrointestinal tract, enters cells and crosses the blood-brain barrier more readily than unacetylated carnitine.
  • acetylcysteine -
    A drug usually used to reduce the thickness of mucus and ease its removal. It is also used to reverse the toxicity of high doses of acetaminophen. Also called N-acetyl-L-cysteine.
  • Acetylcysteine Inhalation Solution
  • Acetylcysteine Oral Solution
  • ACH
    Erik Acharius (10 October 1757–14 August 1819) was a Swedish botanist who pioneered the taxonomy of Lichens and is known as the "father of lichenology".
  • Achalasia
    Achalasia or acalasia is a failure of a ring of muscle (as a sphincter) to relax (completely). It refers most commonly to esophageal achalasia, which is a neuromuscular disorder of the esophagus characterized by the reduced ability to move food down the esophagus (peristalsis). In addition, the inability of the cardia ( also called lower esophageal sphincter)- to relax in response to swallowing (there is increased LES pressure- spasms).
  • Achilles tendinitis
    Achilles tendinitis is tendinitis of the Achilles tendon, generally precipitated by overuse of the affected limb and is more common among athletes ...
  • Achilles tendon rupture
  • achlorhydria - a-klor-HY-dree-a
    A lack of hydrochloric acid in the digestive juices in the stomach. Hydrochloric acid helps digest food.
  • Achondrogenesis
    Achondrogenesis is a number of disorders which are the most severe form of congenital chondrodysplasia (malformation of bones and cartilage). ...
  • Achondrogenesis, type 1B
    Achondrogenesis, type 1B is a severe disorder of cartilage and bone development. This condition is characterized by extremely short limbs with short fingers and toes, a narrow chest, and a prominent, rounded abdomen. Infants with these serious skeletal problems are usually stillborn or die shortly after birth from respiratory failure.
  • Achondrogenesis, type 2
    Achondrogenesis, type 2 is a severe, inherited disorder of bone growth. The disorder is characterized by a short body and limbs and a lack of bone formation in the spine and pelvis. Achondrogenesis, type 2 is a subtype of collagenopathy, types II and XI. Infants with this disorder have short arms and legs, a small chest with short ribs, and underdeveloped lungs. The skull bones may be soft, but they often appear normal on X-ray images. In contrast, bones in the spine (vertebrae) and pelvis do not harden, or ossify. Typical facial features include a prominent forehead, a small chin, and, in some cases, an opening in the roof of the mouth (a cleft palate). The abdomen is enlarged, and excess fluid builds up in the body before birth (a condition called hydrops fetalis). As a result of these serious health problems, infants are usually premature and stillborn or die shortly after birth from respiratory failure. Some infants have lived for a time, however, with intensive medical support.
  • Achondroplasia
    Achondroplasia is an inherited disorder of bone growth. Although achondroplasia literally means "without cartilage formation," in this disorder the problem is not in forming cartilage but in converting it to bone, particularly in the long bones of the arms and legs. All persons with achondroplasia are short. The average height of an adult male with achondroplasia is 131 cm (52 inches, or 4 foot 4), and the average height for adult females is 124 cm (49 inches, or 4 foot 1). A person with achondroplasia has an average-size trunk, short arms and legs with disproportionately short upper arms and thighs, a slightly enlarged head, and a prominent forehead. The person's fingers are short, and the ring finger and middle finger may diverge, giving the hand a three-pronged (trident) appearance. People with achondroplasia are generally of normal intelligence. Health problems associated with achondroplasia can include breathing problems (apnea), obesity, and ear infections. The head is usually large (macrocephaly) and may have enlarged fluid spaces within the brain (ventriculomegaly). Only rarely is this associated with increased pressure in the brain (hydrocephalus). Adults with achondroplasia usually develop a pronounced and permanent sway of the lower back (lordosis) and bowed legs. Older individuals often have back pain, which can cause difficulty with walking.
  • Achromycin
    tetracycline: an antibiotic (trade name Achromycin) derived from microorganisms of the genus Streptomyces and used broadly to treat infections
  • Aci-jel
  • Acidulated Phosphate Fluoride Dental Foam
  • Acidulated Phosphate Fluoride Rinse or Gel
  • acitretin -
    A substance that is used in the prevention of cancer and in the treatment of psoriasis. It belongs to the family of drugs called retinoids.
  • ACL Injuries
  • Aclovate
    (Aclo·vate) (a¢klo-v[amacr]t²) trademark for preparation of alclometasone dipropionate.
  • acne -
    A disorder of the skin in which oil glands and hair glands become inflamed.
  • acoustic - ah-KOOS-tik
    Having to do with sound or hearing.
  • acoustic neurofibromatosis -
    A genetic condition in which tumors form on the nerves of the inner ear and cause loss of hearing and balance. Tumors may also occur in the brain and on nerves in the skull and spinal cord, and may cause loss of speech, eye movement, and the ability to swallow. Also called neurofibromatosis type 2.
  • Acoustic trauma
    ( in acoustic trauma ) ...by damage to the middle ear, tympanic membrane (eardrum), and inner ear. The hair cells that line the inner ear and take ...
  • Acquired Epileptiform Aphasia
  • acquired immunodeficiency syndrome -
    AIDS. An acquired defect in immune system function caused by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). AIDS is associated with increased susceptibility to certain cancers and to opportunistic infections, which are infections that occur rarely except in individuals with weak immune systems.
  • Acquired platelet function defect
  • acridine carboxamide -
    DACA. A substance that is being studied in the treatment of cancer. It belongs to the family of drugs called topoisomerase inhibitors.
  • Acrivastine and Pseudoephedrine
    What is acrivastine and pseudoephedrine? Acrivastine is an antihistamine. It works against the naturally occurring chemical histamine in your body. Acrivastine prevents sneezing; itchy, watery eyes and nose; and other symptoms of allergies and hay fever. Pseudoephedrine is a decongestant. It constricts (shrinks) blood vessels (veins and arteries). This reduces the blood flow to certain areas, which decreases swelling and allows nasal and respiratory (breathing) passages to open up. ...
  • Acrodermatitis
    Die Akrodermatitis chronica atrophicans Herxheimer ist als chronisch fortschreitende Erkrankung das dermatologische Leitbild des 3. ...
  • Acrodysostosis
    Acrodysostosis also known as Arkless-Graham syndrome or Maroteaux-Malamut syndrome is a rare congenital malformation syndrome which involves ...
  • acrylonitrile - ak-ri-low-NYE-tril
    A substance used to make plastics, rubber, and textiles. Being exposed to acrylonitrile may increase the risk of developing certain cancers, such as lung, brain, or prostate cancer.
  • ACT
    The abbreviation ACT or A.C.T. may refer to:* ACT (cognitive model), created by John R Anderson* ACT (examination)* ACT New Zealand (political party and movement)* Act of Parliament* Ada Core Technologies* America Coming Together, an American political group* Annual Change Traffic* Applied Computer Techniques, a computer services company founded in 1965. In 1985 it was renamed Apricot Computers. ...
  • ACT Rinse
  • Actaea reacemosa
  • ACTH
    Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH or corticotropin) is a polypeptide hormone synthesised and secreted from corticotropes in the anterior lobe of the pituitary gland in response to corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) released by the hypothalamus.
  • ACTH-80
  • ActHIB
  • Acthrel
  • Acticin
  • Actimmune
  • actinic keratosis - ak-TIN-ik ker-a-TOE-sis
    A precancerous condition of thick, scaly patches of skin. Also called solar or senile keratosis.
  • Actinomycosis
    Actinomycosis (ak-tuh-nuh-my-KOH-sihs), is a rare infectious bacterial disease of humans generally caused by Actinomyces israelii, A. ...
  • action study -
    In cancer prevention clinical trials, a study that focuses on finding out whether actions people take can prevent cancer.
  • Actiq
  • Activase -
    A protein that is made by the body and that helps dissolve blood clots. It can also be made in the laboratory and is used in the treatment of heart attack and stroke. It is also being studied in the treatment of cancer. Activase belongs to the family of drugs called systemic thrombolytic agents. Also called tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (r-tPA), and Alteplase.
  • activate -
    In biology, to stimulate a cell in a resting state to become active. This causes biochemical and functional changes in the activated cell.
  • Activated Charcoal
    Activated carbon (also called activated charcoal) is the more general term which includes carbon material mostly derived from charcoal. It denotes a material which has an exceptionally high surface area, typically determined by nitrogen adsorption, and includes a large amount of microporosity. Sufficient activation for useful applications may come solely from the high surface area, though often further chemical treatment is used to enhance the adsorbing properties of the material.
  • Activella
    for the prevention of osteoporosis associated with menopause. Activella is a continuous-combined once daily tablet combining estrogen (1 mg estradiol) and progestin (0.5 mg norethindrone acetate). It was previously approved by the FDA for the treatment of moderate to severe vasomotor symptoms associated with menopause and for vulvar and vaginal atrophy associated with menopause. Use of the product is restricted to women with an intact uterus.
  • Acular
    Ketorolac Tromethamine- non steroidal anti-inflammatory eyedrop used to reduce pain after PRK. Manufactured by Allergan.
  • acupressure - AK-yoo-PRESH-er
    The application of pressure or localized massage to specific sites on the body to control symptoms such as pain or nausea. It is a type of complementary and alternative medicine.
  • Acupressure and Acupuncture
  • Acupressure massage
  • acupuncture - AK-yoo-PUNK-cher
    The technique of inserting thin needles through the skin at specific points on the body to control pain and other symptoms. It is a type of complementary and alternative medicine.
  • Acupuncture Anaesthesia
  • Acupuncture Anaesthesia And the Physiological Basis of Acupuncture
  • Acupuncture and Acupressure
  • Acupuncture point
    Acupuncture points (also called "acupoints or tsubo") are specific anatomical locations on the body that are believed to be therapeutically useful for acupuncture, acupressure, sonopuncture, or laser treatment. Medical science does not currently understand how these points work, but cheap commercial devices can detect changes in the electrical conductivity of the skin at these points. Most of the research into acupuncture mechanisms is taking place in China.
  • acustimulation -
    Mild electrical stimulation of acupuncture points to control symptoms such as nausea and vomiting.
  • acute -
    Symptoms or signs that begin and worsen quickly; not chronic.
  • Acute Abdomen
    The term acute abdomen refers to a sudden, severe abdominal pain that is less than 24 hours in duration. ...
  • Acute adrenal crisis
  • Acute arterial occlusion - kidney
  • Acute bilateral obstructive uropathy
  • Acute cerebellar ataxia
    Acute cerebellar ataxia of childhood is a childhood condition characterized by an unsteady gait, most likely secondary to an autoimmune of ...
  • Acute cholecystitis
    Cholecystitis is inflammation of the gall bladder.
  • Acute circulatory collapse (shock)
  • Acute Coronary Syndrome
  • Acute cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection
  • Acute gouty arthritis
    Gout is a disease hallmarked by elevated levels of uric acid in the bloodstream. In this condition, crystals of monosodium urate (MSU) or uric ...
  • Acute HIV infection
    Acute HIV infection or primary HIV infection (also known as "Acute seroconversion syndrome") is the first stage of HIV infection. It occurs before the latency stage and the potential AIDS succeeding the latency stage.
  • Acute intermittent porphyria
    Acute intermittent porphyria is probably the most common porphyria with acute (severe but usually not long-lasting) symptoms. The disorder results from low levels of the enzyme responsible for the third step in heme production. Heme is a vital molecule for all of the body's organs. It is a component of hemoglobin, the molecule that carries oxygen in the blood. Acute intermittent porphyria is a subtype of porphyria. About 80 percent of people with reduced enzyme activity never experience signs or symptoms of acute intermittent porphyria, and others may have only one or a few acute attacks during their lives. When symptoms occur, they are the most severe of any type of porphyria. Acute attacks cause abdominal pain, vomiting, diarrhea, and constipation. During an attack, a person may also experience muscle weakness, seizures, and mental changes such as anxiety and hallucinations. These symptoms can be life-threatening in rare cases. Attacks are triggered by nongenetic factors such as certain drugs, alcohol, smoking, dieting or fasting, certain hormones, other illnesses, and stress. In addition to acute attacks, people with acute intermittent porphyria are at an increased risk of developing abnormal liver function and liver cancer.
  • Acute kidney failure
    Acute renal failure (ARF), also known as acute kidney failure or acute kidney injury, is a rapid loss of renal function due to damage to the kidneys, resulting in retention of nitrogenous (urea and creatinine) and non-nitrogenous waste products that are normally excreted by the kidney. ...
  • acute leukemia -
    A rapidly progressing cancer that starts in blood-forming tissue such as the bone marrow, and causes large numbers of white blood cells to be produced and enter the blood stream.
  • acute lymphoblastic leukemia - lim-fo-BLAST-ik loo-KEE-mee-a
    ALL. A quickly progressing disease in which too many immature white blood cells (called lymphoblasts) are found in the blood and bone marrow. Also called acute lymphocytic leukemia.
  • Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Adult
  • Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Childhood
  • acute lymphocytic leukemia - lim-fo-SIT-ik loo-KEE-mee-a
    ALL. A quickly progressing disease in which too many immature white blood cells (called lymphoblasts) are found in the blood and bone marrow. Also called acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
  • Acute mountain sickness
    Altitude sickness, also known as acute mountain sickness (AMS), altitude illness, hypobaropathy, or soroche, is a pathological effect of high ...
  • acute myelogenous leukemia - mye-eh-LAH-jen-us loo-KEE-mee-a
    AML. A quickly progressing disease in which too many immature white blood cells (not lymphocytes) are found in the blood and bone marrow. Also called acute myeloid leukemia or acute nonlymphocytic leukemia.
  • acute myeloid leukemia - MY-eh-loyd loo-KEE-mee-a
    AML. A quickly progressing disease in which too many immature white blood cells (not lymphocytes) are found in the blood and bone marrow. Also called acute myelogenous leukemia or acute nonlymphocytic leukemia.
  • Acute nephritic syndrome
    Nephritic syndrome (or acute nephritic syndrome) is a collection of signs (known as a syndrome) associated with disorders affecting the kidneys ...
  • acute nonlymphocytic leukemia -
    A quickly progressing disease in which too many immature blood-forming cells are found in the blood and bone marrow. Also called acute myeloid leukemia or acute myelogenous leukemia.
  • acute pain -
    Pain that comes on quickly, can be severe, but lasts a relatively short time.
  • Acute pancreatitis
    Acute pancreatitis is a sudden inflammation of the pancreas. Depending on its severity, it can have severe complications and high mortality ...
  • Acute sinusitis
    Sinusitis is inflammation, either bacterial, viral, allergic or autoimmune, of the paranasal sinuses.
  • Acute Subdural Hematoma
  • Acute tubular necrosis
    Acute tubular necrosis or (ATN) is a medical condition involving the death of tubular cells that form the tubule that transports urine to the ...
  • Acute unilateral obstructive uropathy
  • Acute upper airway obstruction
  • Acutrim
  • acyclovir -
    A substance used to prevent or treat cytomegalovirus and herpes simplex infections that may occur when the body is immunosuppressed. It belongs to the family of drugs called antivirals.
  • Acyclovir Cream or Ointment
  • Acyclovir Oral Suspension
  • Acyclovir Sodium Injection
  • AD 32 -
    A substance that is being studied in the treatment of cancer. It belongs to the family of drugs called antitumor antibiotics. It is an anthracycline.
  • Adacel
    Adacel is a global software technology and systems integrator. The company is a leading developer of critical aviation, speech recognition ...
  • Adalat
  • Adalat CC
  • Adalimumab
    Humira is a fully human monoclonal antibody that inhibits TNFα. Together with infliximab and etanercept, it forms the drug class of the "biologicals" for the treatment of moderate to severe rheumatoid arthritis. Humira's manufacturer is Abbott Laboratories.
  • Adam's Needle
    yucca with long stiff leaves having filamentlike appendages
  • Adamantinoma
    Adamantinoma (from the Greek word adamantinos, meaning "very hard") is a rare bone cancer, making up less than 1% of all bone cancers.
  • Adapalene
    Adapalene is a chemical compound that is primarily used as a topical treatment for acne. It is a retinoid, meaning it is chemically similar to Vitamin A, and is currently sold by Galderma under the trade name Differin in many different forms. In pure form, adapalene is a white to off white powder that is insoluble in water.
  • Adapalene Topical
  • Adderall -
    A combination of drugs that is used as a treatment for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and narcolepsy (a sleep disorder). It belongs to the family of drugs called stimulants. Also called dextroamphetamine-amphetamine.
  • Adderall XR
    Adderall® CII is a pharmaceutical amphetamine used to treat attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and narcolepsy. It was first prescribed in the 1970s as an anorectic (under the brand name Obetrol®), but such usage is now rare.
  • addiction -
    Uncontrollable craving, seeking, and use of a substance such as a drug or alcohol.
  • Addictions
    Addiction is an uncontrollable compulsion to repeat a behavior regardless of its consequences. A person who is addicted is sometimes called an addict.
  • Addison'
  • Addison//'s disease
  • Addison’s disease
    Addison's disease (also known as chronic adrenal insufficiency, hypocortisolism or hypocorticism) is a rare endocrine disorder in which the ...
  • Adefovir
    Adefovir dipivoxil, previously called bis-POM PMEA, with trade names Preveon and Hepsera, is an orally-administered nucleotide analog reverse ...
  • adenocarcinoma - AD-in-o-kar-sin-O-ma
    Cancer that begins in cells that line certain internal organs and that have glandular (secretory) properties.
  • Adenocard
  • adenoid cystic cancer -
    A rare type of cancer that usually begins in the salivary glands.
  • adenoma - ad-in-O-ma
    A noncancerous tumor.
  • Adenomyosis
    endometriosis: the presence of endometrium elsewhere than in the lining of the uterus; causes premenstrual pain and dysmenorrhea
  • adenopathy - ad-en-OP-a-thee
    Large or swollen lymph glands.
  • Adenoscan
  • Adenosine
    Adenosine is a nucleoside composed of a molecule of adenine attached to a ribose sugar molecule (ribofuranose) moiety via a β-N9-glycosidic bond.
  • Adenosine Infusion
  • Adenosine Injection
  • adenosine triphosphate -
    ATP. A substance present in all living cells that provides energy for many metabolic processes and is involved in making RNA. ATP made in the laboratory is being studied in patients with advanced solid tumors to see if it can decrease weight loss and improve muscle strength.
  • adenovirus -
    A group of viruses that cause respiratory tract and eye infections. Adenoviruses used in gene therapy are altered to carry a specific tumor-fighting gene.
  • Adhesion
    Adhesions are fibrous bands that form between tissues and organs, often as a result of injury during surgery. They may be thought of as internal scar tissue. In the case of frozen shoulder (also known as adhesive capsulitis) adhesions grow between the shoulder joint surfaces, restricting motion.
  • Adhesions
    Bands of fibrous scar tissue that bind pelvic organs together.
  • Adie Syndrome
  • Adiphen
  • adjunct agent -
    In cancer therapy, a drug or substance used in addition to the primary therapy.
  • adjunctive therapy -
    Another treatment used together with the primary treatment. Its purpose is to assist the primary treatment.
  • Adjustment disorder
    In psychology, adjustment disorder (AD) is a classification of mental disorder that is a psychological response from an identifiable stressor or ...
  • Adjustment disorders
    The development of emotional or behavioral symptoms in response to an identifiable stressor(s) occurring within three months of the onset of the stressor(s).
  • adjuvant therapy - AD-joo-vant
    Treatment given after the primary treatment to increase the chances of a cure. Adjuvant therapy may include chemotherapy, radiation therapy, hormone therapy, or biological therapy.
  • Adolescence
    Adolescence is the transitional stage of development between childhood and full adulthood, representing the period of time during which a person is biologically adult but emotionally not at full maturity. The ages which are considered to be part of adolescence vary by culture. In the United States, adolescence is generally considered to begin around age 13, and end around 24. ...
  • Adolescent depression
  • Adolescent Development
  • Adolescent Health
  • Adolescent pregnancy
    Teenage pregnancy is defined as a teenaged or underage girl (usually within the ages of 13-19) becoming pregnant. ...
  • Adolescents/Adolescence
  • Adrenal Disease/disorder
  • Adrenal Failure
  • adrenal gland - ah-DREE-nal
    A small gland that produces steroid hormones, adrenaline, and noradrenaline, which help control heart rate, blood pressure, and other important body functions. There are two adrenal glands, one located on top of each kidney.
  • Adrenal Gland Neoplasms
    The term adrenal tumor can refer to one of several benign and malignant neoplasms of the adrenal gland, several of which are notable for their ...
  • Adrenal gland tumor
  • Adrenal Insufficiency
    In medicine, adrenal insufficiency is the inability of the adrenal gland to produce adequate amounts of cortisol in response to stress.
  • Adrenalectomy
    surgical removal of one or both adrenal glands
  • Adrenalin
    Epinephrine (INN) or adrenaline (BAN) is a hormone and a neurotransmitter. A neurotransmitter is a specific kind of hormone, released by neurons to regulate activity of target tissues (e.g. brain cells, muscle cells,...). The Latin roots ad-+renes and the Greek roots epi-+nephros both literally mean "on/to the kidney" (referring to the adrenal gland, which secretes epinephrine). Epinephrine is sometimes shortened to epi in medical jargon.
  • adrenaline -
    A hormone and neurotransmitter. Also called epinephrine.
  • adrenocortical -
    Having to do with or made by the outer layer of the adrenal gland, which produces steroid hormones. There is an adrenal gland on top of each kidney.
  • Adriamycin -
    An anticancer drug that belongs to the family of drugs called antitumor antibiotics. It is an anthracycline. Also called doxorubicin.
  • Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia
  • Adult Day Care
    A day program for three or more individuals in a community group setting that: 1. Is provided in an adult day care facility; and 2. Provides social and health-related services; and 3. Supports frail, impaired, elderly, or other disabled adults who can benefit from care in a group setting outside the home.
  • Adult Primary Liver Cancer
  • Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma
  • Adult Still'
  • adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma -
    ATLL. An aggressive (rapidly progressing) type of T-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma caused by the human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1). It is marked by bone and skin lesions, high calcium levels, and enlarged lymph nodes, spleen and liver.
  • Advair
    Advair is a medicine prescribed for individuals suffering from asthma and COPD. Rather than being a single drug, Advair is actually a combination of two drugs. The first drug is fluticasone propionate (Flovent) and the second drug is salmeterol (Serevent); with this combination of drugs the medicine Advair is formed. Advair is available in 3 dosage forms. The smallest dosage is 100/50, the intermediate dosage is 250/50 and the highest dosage is 500/50. ...
  • Adventure Racing
    Adventure racing is a combination of two or more disciplines, including orienteering and navigation, cross-country running, mountain biking, paddling and climbing and related rope skills. An expedition event can span ten days or more while sprints can be completed in a matter of hours. Typically there is no “dark period” during races, regardless of their length – the choice when (and if) to rest is left to the competitors.
  • adverse effect -
    An unwanted side effect of treatment.
  • Advicor
  • Advil Cold
  • Advocare
  • AE-941 -
    A substance made from shark cartilage that is being studied for its ability to prevent the growth of new blood vessels to solid tumors. It belongs to the family of drugs called angiogenesis inhibitors.
  • AEE788 -
    A substance that is being studied in the treatment of cancer. It belongs to the families of drugs called protein tyrosine kinase inhibitors and angiogenesis inhibitors.
  • Aero-Bid-M
  • aerobic -
    In biochemistry, reactions that need oxygen to happen or happen when oxygen is present.
  • aerobic metabolism -
    A chemical process in which oxygen is used to make energy from carbohydrates (sugars). Also known as aerobic respiration, oxidative metabolism, or cell respiration.
  • aerobic respiration -
    A chemical process in which oxygen is used to make energy from carbohydrates (sugars). Also known as oxidative metabolism, cell respiration, or aerobic metabolism.
  • Aerobics
    Aerobics is an effective physical exercise which is often done to music. Apart from staying power, strength, flexibility, and coordination are trained. Aerobics is very popular with women who do it together in a group following an instructor or alone in front of the television. In the 1960s, Dr. Kenneth H. Cooper introduced an exercise training in order to strengthen the heart and the lungs and took the first step of the "aerob" training in the United States. ...
  • Aerobid
  • Aerochamber Mask
  • aerodigestive tract -
    The combined organs and tissues of the respiratory tract and the upper part of the digestive tract (including the lips, mouth, tongue, nose, throat, vocal cords, and part of the esophagus and windpipe).
  • Aerosol Treatments
  • aerosolize -
    In medicine, to turn a liquid drug into a fine mist that can be inhaled.
  • AFB Culture
  • Afeditab CR
  • Affirmations
    For alternate uses, see Affirmation (disambiguation).
  • Afghanistan
    Afghanistan (Pashtu/Dari-Persian: Afğānistān افغانستان) is a country in Central Asia and is often included as a part of the Middle East. It is bordered by Iran in the west, Pakistan in the south and east, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan and Tajikistan in the north, and China in the easternmost part of the country. It is among the poorest countries in the world.
  • AFP -
    Alpha-fetoprotein. A protein normally produced by a developing fetus. AFP levels are usually undetectable in the blood of healthy nonpregnant adults. An elevated level of AFP suggests the presence of either a primary liver cancer or germ cell tumor.
  • AFP Maternal
  • AFP Tumor Marker
  • Africa, Central
  • Africa, East
  • Africa, North
  • Africa, Southern
  • Africa, West
  • African American
    African Americans, also known as Afro-Americans, Black Americans, or simply blacks, are an ethnic group in the United States of America whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to West and sub-Saharan Africa. Many African Americans also have European and/or Native American ancestors.
  • African American / Black Women
  • African plum tree
  • African-American Health
  • Afrin
    Afrin (عفرين ʿAfrīn, Kurdish: Efrîn) is both a district and city of the Aleppo Governorate, Syria. The district includes the city of 80,000 inhabitants and 366 surrounding villages and farms. The region of Afrin with its 490,000 inhabitants is next to Kurd-Dagh ("Mountain of the Kurds"). ...
  • Afrin Children's Pump Mist
  • AG-013736 -
    A substance that is being studied in the treatment of cancer. It belongs to the families of drugs called angiogenesis inhibitors and protein tyrosine kinase inhibitors.
  • AG2037 -
    A substance that is being studied in the treatment of cancer. It belongs to the family of drugs called glycinamide ribonucleotide formyl transferase inhibitors.
  • AG3340 -
    A substance that is being studied in the treatment of cancer. It belongs to the family of drugs called angiogenesis inhibitors. AG3340 is a matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor. Also called prinomastat.
  • AG337 -
    A substance that is being studied in the treatment of cancer. It belongs to the family of drugs called thymidylate synthase inhibitors. Also called nolatrexed.
  • Agalsidase Beta
  • Agammaglobulinemia
    a rare immunological disorder characterized by the virtual absence of gamma globulin in the blood and consequent susceptibility to infection
  • Agathosma betulina
  • Age-related hearing loss
  • Agenerase Oral Solution
  • agent study -
    In cancer prevention clinical trials, a study that tests whether taking certain medicines, vitamins, minerals, or food supplements can prevent cancer. Also a called chemoprevention study.
  • Ageusia
    Ageusia (pronounced ay-GOO-see-uh) is the loss of taste functions of the tongue, particularly the inability to detect sweetness, sourness, bitterness, and saltiness. It is typically a symptom of anosmia - a loss of the sense of smell. Because the tongue can only indicate texture and differentiate between sweet, sour, bitter and salty, most of what is perceived as the sense of taste is actually derived from smell. ...
  • agglutinin -
    A substance that makes particles (such as bacteria or cells) stick together to form a clump or a mass.
  • Aggrenox
  • aggressive -
    A quickly growing cancer.
  • Aggressive Behavior
    The child cannot control his behavior and responds in an aggressive manner.
  • aggressive lymphoma -
    A type of lymphoma that grows and spreads quickly, and has severe symptoms. It is seen frequently in patients who are HIV-positive (AIDS-related lymphoma). Also called intermediate-grade or high-grade lymphoma.
  • Aging
    Ageing or aging is the process of getting older. This article focuses the social, cultural, and economic effects of ageing. The biology of ageing is treated in detail in senescence.Ageing is an important part of all human societies reflecting the biological changes that occur, but also reflecting cultural and societal conventions.Age is usually, but wholly arbitrarily, measured in years and a person's birthday is often an important event.
  • Aging Skin
  • agnogenic myeloid metaplasia -
    A progressive, chronic disease in which the bone marrow is replaced by fibrous tissue and blood is made in organs such as the liver and the spleen, instead of in the bone marrow. This disease is marked by an enlarged spleen and progressive anemia. Also called chronic idiopathic myelofibrosis, primary myelofibrosis, myelosclerosis with myeloid metaplasia, and idiopathic myelofibrosis.
  • Agnus Castus
  • agonist -
    A drug that triggers an action from a cell or another drug.
  • Agoral Liquid
  • Agoraphobia
    "Agoraphobia" is a song by the American alternative rock band Incubus. It is the third song from their 2004 album, A Crow Left of the Murder... It is considered a single, though it was only released to radio stations as a promo.
  • agranulocyte - A-gran-yoo-lo-SITE
    A type of white blood cell; monocytes and lymphocytes are agranulocytes.
  • Agranulocytosis
    Agranulocytosis (a, from the Greek, meaning without; granulocyte, a particular kind of cell; osis, from the Greek, meaning condition [esp. disorder]) is an acute condition involving a severe and dangerous leukopenia particularly of neutrophils causing a neutropenia in the circulating blood.
  • Agraphia
    Dysgraphia (or agraphia) is a deficiency in the ability to write, regardless of the ability to read, not due to intellectual impairment.
  • Agrimony
    Agrimony is a genus of herb in the family Rosaceae. It includes three species: Agrimonia eupatoria, Agrimonia pilosa, and Agrimonia procera. Historically, it was thought to have medicinal value.
  • Ah-chew D
  • AIDS -
    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. An acquired defect in immune system function caused by human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1). AIDS is associated with increased susceptibility to certain cancers and to opportunistic infections, which are infections that occur rarely except in individuals with weak immune systems.
  • AIDS - Living and Coping
  • AIDS and HIV
  • AIDS and Infections
    AIDS (Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome or Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome, rarely written Aids) is a disease characterized by the destruction of the human immune system. It stands today as a global epidemic, that originated in sub-Saharan Africa during the twentieth century. Although there are treatments to hinder the progress of AIDS, there is yet no known cure or vaccine.
  • AIDS and Pregnancy
  • Aids/acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
  • Air Embolisms
  • Air Pollution
    Air pollution is a broad term applied to all chemical and biological agents that modify the natural characteristics of the atmosphere.
  • Air Pollution &
  • Air Quality
    The Air Quality Index (AQI) is a standardized index of the air quality in a given location, given in parts per billion. It measures mainly ground-level ozone and particulates (except the pollen count), but may also include sulphur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide.
  • Airelle
    Les airelles sont des sous-arbrisseaux montagnards des régions tempérées du genre Vaccinium (famille des Ericacæ). Le nom désigne également leur fruits.
  • Airline BMI
  • Airplane ear
  • Airsickness
    Airsickness is the sensation of nausea which is induced by air travel. It is considered normal response of healthy individuals when exposed to an environment characterized by unfamiliar motion and orientation clues.
  • Airway blockage
  • Airway blockage during sleep
  • Airway obstruction
    Airway obstruction is a respiratory problem caused by increased resistance in the bronchioles (usually from a decreased radius of the bronchioles ...
  • Airways disease, including asthma, later in life
  • AJCC staging system -
    A system developed by the American Joint Committee on Cancer for describing the extent of cancer in a patient’s body. The descriptions include TNM: T describes the size of the tumor and if it has invaded nearby tissue, N describes any lymph nodes that are involved, and M describes metastasis (spread of cancer from one body part to another).
  • AK-Chlor
  • AK-Dilate
  • AK-Nefrin
  • AK-Pred
  • AK-Spore Ophthalmic Ointment
  • AK-Sulf
  • AK-T-Caine
  • AK-Tracin
  • AKBeta
  • Akne Mycin Ointment
  • AKTob
  • ALA
    The American Library Association promotes libraries and library education in the United States and internationally. It has approximately 64,000 members. It was founded in 1876 in Philadelphia and chartered in 1879 in Massachusetts. Its head office is in Chicago.
  • Alabama
    Alabama is a state located in the southern United States.
  • ALAD deficiency porphyria
    ALAD deficiency porphyria is a very rare type of porphyria. The disorder results from low levels of the enzyme responsible for the second step in heme production. Heme is a vital molecule for all of the body's organs. It is a component of hemoglobin, the molecule that carries oxygen in the blood. ALAD deficiency porphyria is a subtype of porphyria. Signs and symptoms, which have varied in the few people diagnosed with ALAD deficiency porphyria, include weak muscle tone (hypotonia) in infancy, acute attacks of abdominal pain and muscle weakness, and muscle pain or numbness. These signs and symptoms can begin in infancy, childhood, or adulthood.
  • Alagesic
  • Alagille syndrome
    Alagille syndrome is a genetic disorder that affects the liver, heart, and other systems of the body. Problems associated with the disorder generally become evident in infancy or early childhood. The severity of the disorder, however, can vary within the same family, with symptoms ranging from so mild as to go unnoticed to severe heart and/or liver disease requiring transplantation. Signs and symptoms arising from liver damage in Alagille syndrome may include a yellowish tinge in the skin and the whites of the eyes (jaundice), itching, and deposits of cholesterol in the skin (xanthomas). A liver biopsy may indicate too few bile ducts (bile duct paucity). Other signs of Alagille syndrome include congenital heart problems and an unusual butterfly shape of the bones of the spinal column that can be seen in an x-ray. Many people with Alagille syndrome have similar facial features, including a broad, prominent forehead, deep-set eyes, and a small pointed chin. The kidneys and central nervous system may also be affected.
  • Alamag
  • Alamag Suspension
  • alanine aminopeptidase -
    AAP. An enzyme that is used as a biomarker to detect damage to the kidneys, and that may be used to help diagnose certain kidney disorders. It is found at high levels in the urine when there are kidney problems.
  • alanine transferase -
    An enzyme found in the liver and other tissues. A high level of alanine transferase released into the blood may be a sign of liver damage, cancer, or other diseases. Also called serum glutamate pyruvate transaminase or SGPT.
  • alanosine -
    A substance that is being studied in the treatment of cancer. It belongs to the family of drugs called antimetabolites. Also called SDX-102.
  • Alaska
    On January 3, 1959, Alaska was admitted to the United States as the 49th state. The population of the state is 626,932, as of 2000. The name "Alaska" is most likely derived from the Aleut word for "great country" or "mainland". The natives called it "Alyeska", meaning "the great land". ...
  • Alaska Native Health
  • Alaska Native Women
  • Albania
    Albania is a Mediterranean country in southeastern Europe. It is bordered by Montenegro in the north, Kosovo in the north-east — both still formally part of Serbia-Montenegro, the Republic of Macedonia in the east, and Greece in the south, has a coast on the Adriatic Sea in the west, and a coast on the Ionian Sea in the southwest. The country is an emerging democracy and is formally named the Republic of Albania (Albanian: Republika e Shqipërisë).
  • Albendazole
    Albendazole marketed as Albenza or Zentel, is a drug indicated for the treatment of a variety of worm infestations.
  • Alberta
    Alberta is one of Canada's provinces. Alberta celebrates 100 years as a province in 2005 had a royal visit from Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip in May 2005.
  • Albinism
    Albinism (from Latin albus, "white"; see , also called achromia, achromasia, or achromatosis) is a form of hypopigmentary congenital disorder ...
  • Albinism Ocular
    Albinism (from Latin albus, "white"; see , also called achromia, achromasia, or achromatosis) is a form of hypopigmentary congenital disorder ...
  • Albumin
    Albumin is a blood plasma protein that is produced in the liver and forms a large proportion of all plasma protein. It is also found in egg white.
  • Albuterol
    Salbutamol (INN) or albuterol (USAN) is a short-acting β2-adrenergic receptor agonist used for the relief of bronchospasm in conditions such as asthma and COPD. It is marketed by the Allen & Hanbury's respiratory division of GlaxoSmithKline under the trade name Ventolin. The name Albuterol comes from Salbutamol aersol.
  • Albuterol and Ipratropium
  • Albuterol Inhaler
  • Albuterol Nebulizer Solution
  • Albuterol Oral Syrup
  • Albuterol Oral Tablets
  • Alclometasone
  • Alcohol Abuse in Pregnancy
  • Alcohol and Youth
  • Alcohol or drug abuse
  • Alcohol withdrawal
    Alcohol Withdrawal Syndrome is the set of symptoms seen when an individual reduces or stops alcohol consumption after prolonged periods of ...
  • Alcohol Withdrawal Delirium
    Delirium tremens (colloquially, the DTs, "the horrors", "the fear", "the abdabs" or "the rats"; afflicted individuals referred to as "jitterbugs ...
  • Alcohol-related birth defects
  • Alcohol-related neurodevelopmental disorder
    Category: Birth defects Also known as ARND. Children who had prenatal alcohol exposure but do not manifest the full symptoms of FAS may exhibit alcohol-related neurodevelopmental disorder. ARND is caused by prenatal alcohol exposure and refers to alcohol-induced cognitive and behavioral problems without the characteristic facial or growth abnormalities seen among children with FAS. Find out more about Alcohol-related neurodevelopmental disorder: Articles
  • Alcoholic cardiomyopathy
    Alcoholic cardiomyopathy is a disease in which the chronic long-term abuse of alcohol leads to heart failure. ...
  • Alcoholic Cirrhosis
    Alcoholic cirrhosis is the destruction of normal liver tissue, leaving non-functioning scar tissue. Symptoms may include those of alcoholic ...
  • Alcoholic Hepatitis
    Alcoholic hepatitis is hepatitis (inflammation of the liver) due to excessive intake of alcohol. While distinct from cirrhosis, it is regarded as ...
  • Alcoholic ketoacidosis
    Ketoacidosis is a type of metabolic acidosis which is caused by high concentrations of ketone bodies, formed by the breakdown of fatty acids and ...
  • Alcoholic liver disease
    Alcoholic liver disease is the major cause of liver disease in Western countries, (in Asian countries, viral hepatitis is the major cause). ...
  • Alcoholic neuropathy
    Neuropathy is a medical term describing disorders of the nerves of the peripheral nervous system (specifically excluding encephalopathy and ...
  • Aldactazide
  • Aldactone
    Brand name for spirolactone, a prescription high blood pressure medication that is also prescribed to treat women's hair loss.
  • aldesleukin -
    A laboratory-made colony-stimulating factor that stimulates the production of blood cells, especially platelets, during chemotherapy. It is a cytokine that belongs to the family of drugs called hematopoietic (blood-forming) agents. Also called interleukin-2 or IL-2.
  • Aldomet
    Methyldopa or alpha-methyldopa (brand names Aldomet, Apo-Methyldopa, Dopamet, Novomedopa) is a centrally-acting antiadrenergic antihypertensive medication.
  • Aldomet Suspension
  • Aldosterone
    Aldosterone is a steroid hormone synthesized from cholesterol by the enzyme aldosterone synthase. It is formed in the outer-section (zona glomerulosa) of the adrenal cortex of the adrenal gland, as the cells of other sections don't have the corresponding enzyme. It is the sole endogenous member of the class of mineralocorticoids. It helps regulate the body's electrolyte balance by acting on the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR). ...
  • Aldurazyme
  • Alefacept
  • alemtuzumab -
    A type of monoclonal antibody used in the treatment of leukemia. Monoclonal antibodies are laboratory-produced substances that can locate and bind to cancer cells. Also called Campath-1H.
  • Alendronate
    Alendronate (Fosamax) is a bisphosphonate drug used for the treatment of osteoporosis (see Maturitas 2004; 48: 179-192).
  • Alendronate Oral Solution
  • alendronate sodium -
    A drug that affects bone metabolism. It is used in treating osteoporosis and Paget's disease, and is being studied in the treatment of hypercalcemia (abnormally high levels of calcium in the blood) and in treating and reducing the risk of bone pain caused by cancer. Alendronate sodium belongs to the family of drugs called bisphosphonates.
  • Alenic Alka
  • Alesse
  • Aleve
    Naproxen (trade names: Aleve, Anaprox, Naprosyn, Naprelan) is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) commonly used for the reduction of mild to moderate pain, fever, inflammation and stiffness caused by conditions such as osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, gout, ankylosing spondylitis, injury, menstrual cramps, tendinitis, bursitis, and the treatment of primary dysmenorrhea. It works by reducing hormones that cause inflammation and pain in the body.
  • Alexander disease
    Alexander disease is a rare disorder of the nervous system that usually begins during infancy or early childhood. Onset can also occur, although less commonly, during the school-age years (juvenile form) or adulthood. The disorder is characterized by abnormal deposits of proteins, called Rosenthal fibers, in specialized brain cells (astrocytes). Alexander disease is considered one of the leukodystrophies, a group of disorders where the primary abnormality is the inability to maintain the fatty covering (myelin) that insulates nerve fibers in the brain.
  • Alfalfa
    Alfalfa (family: Fabaceae, the pea family) is a genus of perennial flowering plant, Medicago, most commonly referring to M. sativa L., also called lucerne.
  • Alfenta
    Alfentanil (Alfenta) is a parenteral short-acting opioid painkiller, used for anaesthesia in surgery. While it gives less cardiovascular complications, it tends to give stronger respiratory depression. Alfentanil is a Schedule I drug under the Single Convention on Narcotic Drug.
  • Alfentanil Hydrochloride Injection
  • Alferon N
  • Algeria
    The People’s Democratic Republic of Algeria, or Algeria, is a nation in north Africa, and the second largest country on the African continent. It is bordered by Tunisia in the northeast, Libya in the east, Niger in the southeast, Mali and Mauritania in the southwest, and Morocco as well as a few kilometers of its annexed territory, Western Sahara, in the west. ...
  • Alglucerase injection
  • Algoxyll
  • Alka-Seltzer Plus Cold
  • Alka-Seltzer Plus Cold and Sinus
  • alkalinization - AL-ka-LIN-ih-ZAY-shun
    The process by which a substance becomes an alkali. An alkali is the opposite of an acid.
  • alkaloid -
    A member of a large group of chemicals that are made by plants and have nitrogen in them. Some alkaloids have been shown to work against cancer.
  • Alkalosis
    Alkalosis refers to a condition reducing hydrogen ion concentration of arterial blood plasma (alkalemia). Generally alkalosis is said to occur when pH of the blood exceeds 7.45. The opposite condition is acidosis.
  • Alkaptonuria
    Alkaptonuria is an inherited condition that causes urine to turn black when exposed to air. Ochronosis, a buildup of dark pigment in connective tissues such as cartilage and skin, is also characteristic of the disorder. People with alkaptonuria typically develop arthritis in adulthood, particularly in the spine and large joints.
  • Alkaslim
  • Alkeran Injection
  • alkylating agent -
    A drug that is used in the treatment of cancer. It interferes with the cell's DNA and inhibits cancer cell growth.
  • ALL -
    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia. A quickly progressing disease in which too many immature white blood cells called lymphoblasts are found in the blood and bone marrow. Also called acute lymphocytic leukemia.
  • all-trans retinoic acid -
    A form of vitamin A that is used in the treatment of acne. It is also being studied in cancer prevention and as a treatment for acute promyelocytic leukemia, usually in combination with other drugs. Also called tretinoin.
  • Allegra-D
  • Allent
  • Aller-Chlor
  • Aller-Chlor Syrup
  • Allergen Ear Drops
  • Allergic conjunctivitis
    Allergic conjunctivitis is inflammation of the conjunctiva (the membrane covering the white part of the eye) due to allergy. ...
  • Allergic Reaction, Anaphylaxis
  • Allergic Reaction, Angioedema
  • Allergic rhinitis
    Allergic rhinitis, also called pollinosis, hay fever or nasal allergies, is a collection of symptoms, predominantly in the nose and eyes, that occur after exposure to airborne particles of dust, dander, or the pollens of certain seasonal plants in people who are allergic to these substances.
  • Allergic vasculitis
  • Allergy to mold - animal dander - dust
  • AllerMax
  • Allfen
  • Allium
    Allium is the onion genus with about 1250 species, mostly classified in its own family Alliaceae. Some botanists used to classify it in the lily family (Liliaceae).
  • Allium sativum
    garlic: bulbous herb of southern Europe widely naturalized; bulb breaks up into separate strong-flavored cloves
  • allogeneic - Al-o-jen-AY-ik
    Taken from different individuals of the same species. Also called allogenic.
  • allogeneic bone marrow transplantation - AL-o-jen-AY-ik
    A procedure in which a person receives stem cells (cells from which all blood cells develop) from a genetically similar, but not identical, donor.
  • allogeneic stem cell transplantation - AL-o-jen-AY-ik
    A procedure in which a person receives stem cells (cells from which all blood cells develop) from a genetically similar, but not identical, donor.
  • allogenic -
    Taken from different individuals of the same species. Also called allogeneic.
  • Allopathy
    The term "allopathy" was coined by Samuel Hahnemann. The term "allopathic medicine" is used most frequently in the context of critiques of conventional medicine.
  • Alloprim Injection
  • allopurinol -
    A drug that lowers high levels of uric acid (a byproduct of metabolism) in the blood caused by some cancer treatments.
  • Allopurinol Injection
  • Allovectin-7 -
    A substance that is being studied as a gene therapy agent in the treatment of cancer. It increases the ability of the immune system to recognize cancer cells and kill them.
  • Almond
    The almond, Prunus dulcis (formerly classified as Prunus amygdalus, or Amygdalus communis) is a small deciduous tree belonging to the Subfamily Prunoideae of the Family Rosaceae. An almond is also the fruit of this tree. It is classified with the peach in the Subgenus Amygdalus within Prunus, distinguished from the other subgenera by the corrugated seed shell. ...
  • Almond Oil
    Sweet Nut derived from almond trees in Europe. Almond oil is usually distilled to remove the toxic prussic acid. It has potent soothing properties.
  • Almora
    Almora is a high-lying town at the foot of the Himalaya, 137 km (85 miles) north of Bareilly.
  • Alocril
  • aloe-emodin -
    A substance found in certain plants, including aloe vera. It belongs to a family of compounds called anthraquinones, which have shown anti-inflammatory and anticancer effects.
  • alopecia - al-oh-PEE-shuh
    The lack or loss of hair from areas of the body where hair is usually found. Alopecia can be a side effect of some cancer treatments.
  • Alora
    Álora is a town of southern Spain in the province of Málaga; 17 m. W.N.W. of Malaga, on the right bank of the river Guadalhorce, and on the Cordova-Malaga railway. Pop. (1900) 10,525, (2002) 12,538.
  • Alosetron
    Alosetron is a 5-HT3 antagonist used for the management of severe diarrhoea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) in women only. It was withdrawn from the market in 2000 owing to the occurrence of serious life-threatening gastrointestinal adverse effects, but was reintroduced in 2002 with availability and use restricted. It is currently marketed by GlaxoSmithKline under the trade name Lotronex.
  • ALP
    The Australian Labor Party or ALP is Australia's oldest political party. It is so-named because of its origins in and close links to the trade union movement. While standard practice in Australian English is to spell the word labour with an "-our" ending, in reference to the name of the party it is spelt with an "-or" ending.
  • Alpha-1 Antitrypsin
    A protein produced in the liver that blocks the destructive effects of certain enzymes.
  • Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency
    Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency is an inherited disorder that can cause lung disease in adults and liver disease in adults and children. The first signs of lung disease caused by alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency usually appear between ages 20 and 40. The earliest symptoms are shortness of breath following mild activity, reduced ability to exercise, and wheezing. Other symptoms can include unintentional weight loss, recurring respiratory infections, fatigue, a barrel-shaped chest, rapid heartbeat upon standing, and vision abnormalities. Smoking or exposure to tobacco smoke accelerates the appearance of symptoms and damage to the lungs. About 10 percent of infants and 15 percent of adults also have liver damage caused by alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency. Symptoms of liver disease can include a swollen abdomen, coughing up blood, swollen feet or legs, and yellowing of the skin and whites of the eyes (jaundice). In rare cases, alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency also causes a skin condition known as panniculitis, which is characterized by hardened skin with painful lumps or patches. Panniculitis varies in severity and can occur at any age.
  • Alpha-blockers
    pharmaceutical drugs that act on the prostate by relaxing certain types of muscle tissue; these pharmaceutical drugs are often used in the treatment of BPH.
  • alpha-fetoprotein - AL-fa-FEE-toe-PRO-teen
    AFP. A protein normally produced by a fetus. AFP levels are usually undetectable in the blood of healthy adult men or women (who are not pregnant). An elevated level of AFP suggests the presence of either a primary liver cancer or germ cell tumor.
  • Alpha-Linolenic Acid (ALA)
    Plant-based omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid.
  • Alpha-Lipoic Acid
    Alpha lipoic acid may help regenerate other dietary antioxidants, like vitamins C and E, and major intrinsic antioxidants, like L-glutathione and co-enzyme Q10.
  • Alphagan
  • AlphaNine SD
  • Alphatrex
    (Al·pha·trex) (al²f[schwa]-treks¢) trademark for preparations of betamethasone maleate.
  • Alphatrex Aerosol
  • Alport syndrome
    Alport syndrome is a genetic condition characterized by the progressive loss of kidney function and hearing. Alport syndrome can also affect the eyes. The presence of blood in the urine (hematuria) is almost always found in this condition. Many people with Alport syndrome also exhibit high levels of protein in their urine (proteinuria). As this condition progresses, the kidneys become less able to function properly and kidney failure results. Hearing loss is a common feature of Alport syndrome, but the abnormalities in the eyes seldom lead to loss of vision.
  • Alprazolam
    Alprazolam is an anxiolytic benzodiazepine used to treat anxiety disorders. It is sold under several brand names such as Xanax, Xanor and Tafil.
  • Alprazolam Extended-Release
  • Alprazolam Intensol
  • Alprazolam Oral Solution
  • Alprostadil
    Prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) is pharmaceutically known as Alprostadil. It is used as a drug in the treatment of erectile dysfunction and has ...
  • Alprostadil injection
  • Alprostadil pellets
  • Alströ
  • Alström syndrome
    Alström syndrome is a rare inherited condition that affects many body systems. Signs and symptoms of the condition begin in infancy or early childhood. The disorder is characterized by progressive loss of vision and hearing, heart disease, obesity, type 2 diabetes (the most common form of diabetes), short stature, and liver and kidney disease. Some affected individuals have a skin condition called acanthosis nigricans, which causes the skin in body folds and creases to become thick, dark, and velvety. The signs and symptoms of Alström syndrome vary in severity, and affected individuals may not have all of the characteristic features of the disorder.
  • Alström syndrome
    Alström syndrome is a rare genetic disorder. It is among the rarest genetic disorders in the world, as currently it has only 266 reported cases ...
  • ALT
    A special key on most computer keyboards that allows users to access alternate features and keyboard "hotkeys". Alt is almost always used in conjunction with another key, such as "F4" or "Ctrl".
  • Alteplase -
    A protein that is made by the body and that helps dissolve blood clots. It can also be made in the laboratory and is used in the treatment of heart attack and stroke. It is also being studied in the treatment of cancer. Alteplase belongs to the family of drugs called systemic thrombolytic agents. Also called tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (r-tPA), and Activase.
  • alteration -
    A change resulting in something that is different from the original.
  • AlternaGEL Liquid
  • Alternative and Natural Approaches
  • Alternative medical systems
    Alternative medical systems is the precise name of a NCCAM (http://nccam.nih.gov/health/whatiscam/) classification for those forms of alternative medicine that are built upon a complete system of theory and practice.
  • alternative medicine -
    Practices used instead of standard treatments. They generally are not recognized by the medical community as standard or conventional medical approaches. Alternative medicine includes dietary supplements, megadose vitamins, herbal preparations, special teas, acupuncture, massage therapy, magnet therapy, spiritual healing, and meditation.
  • Alternative Therapies
    Treatments based on speculative or abstract reasoning as compared to common practice.
  • Alternative Therapies Home
  • Alternative Treatments
  • Althaea officinalis
    Althaea is a perennial herb found commonly on the banks of rivers and in salt marshes, preferring moist, sandy soils. It is indigenous to Europe and portions of Asia, flowering from July to September.
  • Altinac
  • Altitude Sickness
    Altitude sickness, also known as acute mountain sickness (AMS), altitude illness, hypobaropathy, or soroche, is a pathological effect of high altitude on humans, caused by acute exposure to low air pressure (usually outdoors at high altitudes). ...
  • Altocor
  • Altoprev
  • altretamine -
    An anticancer drug that belongs to the family of drugs called alkylating agents.
  • Aludrox
  • alum -
    A type of immune adjuvant (a substance used to help boost the immune response to a vaccine). Also called aluminum sulfate.
  • Aluminum and Magnesium Hydroxide
  • Aluminum and Magnesium Hydroxide Oral Suspension
  • Aluminum Hydroxide
    a white, bulky, amorphous powder, Al(OH) 3 , used as an antacid, and as a phosphate binder in the treatment of urolithiasis and hyperphosphatemia in the form of aluminum hydroxide gel or dried aluminum hydroxide gel (see under gel); it is also used as an adjuvant in adsorbed vaccines and toxoids.
  • Aluminum Hydroxide and Magnesium Trisilicate
  • Aluminum Hydroxide Oral Liquid
  • Aluminum Hydroxide, Magnesium Carbonate Chewables
  • Aluminum Hydroxide, Magnesium Carbonate Oral Suspension
  • aluminum sulfate -
    A type of immune adjuvant (a substance used to help boost the immune response to a vaccine). Also called alum.
  • Alupent
    metaproterenol: a bronchodilator (trade name Alupent) used to treat asthma and emphysema and other lung conditions; available in oral or inhalant forms; side effects include tachycardia and shakiness
  • Alupent Inhalation
  • Alupent Solution
  • Alupent Syrup
  • ALVAC-CEA vaccine -
    A cancer vaccine containing a canary pox virus (ALVAC) combined with the human carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) gene.
  • alveoli - al-VEE-o-lye
    Tiny air sacs at the end of the bronchioles in the lungs.
  • Alzheimer disease
    Alzheimer disease is a degenerative disease of the brain that causes gradual loss of memory, judgment, and ability to function. The disorder usually appears in people older than age 65, but there are also forms of early-onset disease, which are less common. Genetic changes are related to the following types of Alzheimer disease. Alzheimer disease, type 1 Alzheimer disease, type 2 Alzheimer disease, type 3 Alzheimer disease, type 4 Additional types of Alzheimer disease have been reported, but the responsible mutations have not been adequately described, or the cause is not genetic. Memory loss is the most common sign of this disease. The loss of memory becomes more than the usual forgetfulness experienced by most older people. Even in familiar settings, a person with Alzheimer disease may get lost or become confused. Normal daily tasks, such as doing simple math and naming objects and people, become challenging. Preparing meals, doing laundry, and performing other household chores can also become difficult. Problems with dressing, eating, and personal care as well as agitation, restlessness, and inappropriate behavior develop as the disease progresses. In addition, personality changes and an inability to interact in a socially appropriate manner are common. The patient's speech eventually becomes difficult to understand, and the individual may require total care. The course of the disease is usually 8 to 10 years, but can range from 1 to 25 years.
  • Alzheimer disease, type 2
    Alzheimer disease, type 2 is a late-onset, familial form of Alzheimer disease. This degenerative disease of the brain causes gradual loss of memory, judgment, and ability to function. Alzheimer disease, type 2 is a subtype of Alzheimer disease. Alzheimer disease, type 2 is characterized by progressive brain deterioration after age 65, leading to a gradual loss of memory, reasoning, and ability to perform social and personal care functions. Please see the Alzheimer disease summary for further information about the signs and symptoms of this disorder.
  • Alzheimer''''s
  • Alzheimer's Caregivers
  • Alzheimer’s disease
    Alzheimer's disease (AD), also called Alzheimer disease, Senile Dementia of the Alzheimer Type (SDAT) or simply Alzheimer's, is the most common ...
  • Amachazuru
  • Amanita phalloides -
    A type of poisonous mushroom that has harmful effects on the kidneys and liver. It is responsible for most fatal cases of mushroom poisoning. Also called death cap.
  • Amantadine
    Amantadine, 1-adamantane amine, is an antiviral drug that was approved by the FDA in 1976 for the treatment of influenza type A in adults. The drug has also been demonstrated to help reduce symptoms of Parkinson's disease and drug-induced short-term extrapyramidal syndroms. As an antiparkinsonic it is being prescribed together with L-DOPA when L-DOPA responses decline (probably due to tolerance).
  • Amantadine Oral Syrup
  • Amaphen
  • Amaurosis fugax
    Amaurosis fugax (Latin fugax meaning fleeting, Greek amaurosis meaning darkening, dark, or obscure) is a transient monocular visual loss. ...
  • AMBI 60/580
  • Ambien® -
    A drug used to treat insomnia (inability to sleep), and anxiety. It belongs to a family of drugs known as imidazopyridines (sedative hypnotics). Also called zolpidem.
  • Amebic Colitis
  • Amebic liver abscess
    A amoebic liver abscess is a type of liver abscess caused by amebiasis.
  • amelanotic melanoma -
    A type of skin cancer in which the cells do not make melanin. Skin lesions are often irregular and may be pink, red, or have light brown, tan, or gray at the edges.
  • Amelogenesis imperfecta
    Amelogenesis imperfecta presents with abnormal formation of the enamel or external layer of teeth. Enamel is composed mostly of mineral, that is ...
  • Amenorrhea - primary
  • Americaine Topical
  • Americaine-Otic
  • American Elm
    The American Elm Ulmus americana is a species of elm native to eastern North America, occurring from Nova Scotia west to southeast Saskatchewan, and south to Florida and central Texas. It is also sometimes known as White Elm or American White Elm.
  • American Ginseng
    American Ginseng (Panax quinquefolius), is a species of ginseng native to eastern North America. It is a perennial dicot of the family Araliaceae.
  • American Indian
    Native Americans (also Original Americans, Aboriginal Peoples, Aboriginal Americans, American Indians, Amerindians, Amerind, Indians, First Nations, First Peoples, Native Canadians, or Indigenous Peoples of America) are those peoples indigenous to the Americas, living there prior to European colonization. This term encompasses a large number of distinct tribes, states, and ethnic groups, many of them still enduring as political communities. ...
  • American Indian / Alaska Native Vaccination
  • American Indian / Alaska Native Women
  • American Mandrake
  • American pennyroyal
    pennyroyal: erect hairy branching American herb having purple-blue flowers; yields an essential oil used as an insect repellent and sometimes in folk medicine
  • American Samoa
    American Samoa is an unorganized, unincorporated territory of the United States in the South Pacific Ocean, to the East of the larger state of Samoa.
  • American Sign Language
    American Sign Language is the dominant sign language in the United States, English-speaking Canada and parts of Mexico. American Sign Language is usually abbreviated ASL. Although it has also been known as Ameslan or Amslan, these abbreviations are not generally used and are considered obsolete. As with other sign languages, or more properly, visual-gestural-spatial languages, its grammar and syntax are separate and distinct from the spoken language(s) in its area of influence. ...
  • American Sloe
  • Americet
  • Amerituss AD liquid
  • Amethopterin
    Methotrexate (abbreviated MTX; formerly known as amethopterin) is an antimetabolite drug used in treatment of cancer and autoimmune disease. It acts by inhibiting the metabolism of folic acid.
  • Amevive
  • Ami-Tex LA
  • Amicar
  • Amicar Injection
  • Amicar Oral Syrup
  • amifostine -
    A drug used as a chemoprotective drug to control some of the side effects of chemotherapy and radiation therapy.
  • Amifostine Injection
  • Amigesic
  • amikacin -
    An antibiotic drug used to treat infection. It belongs to the family of drugs called aminoglycoside antibiotics.
  • Amikacin Sulfate Injection
  • Amikin
  • Amiloride
    Amiloride is an antihypertensive, a potassium-sparing diuretic that was first approved for use in 1967 and helps to treat hypertension and congestive heart failure.
  • Amiloride and Hydrochlorothiazide
  • Amino Acid K
  • amino acid sequence -
    The arrangement of amino acids in a protein. Proteins can be made from 20 different kinds of amino acids, and the structure and function of each type of protein are determined by the kinds of amino acids used to make it and how they are arranged.
  • Amino Acids
    In chemistry, an amino acid is any molecule that contains both amino and carboxylic acid functional groups.In biochemistry, this shorter and more general term is frequently used to refer to alpha amino acids: those amino acids in which the amino and carboxylate functionalities are attached to the same carbon.
  • aminocamptothecin -
    An anticancer drug that belongs to the family of drugs called topoisomerase inhibitors.
  • Aminocaproic Acid
  • Aminocaproic Acid Injection
  • Aminocaproic Acid Oral Syrup
  • aminoglutethimide - a-MEE-no-gloo-TETH-ih-mide
    An anticancer drug that belongs to the family of drugs called nonsteroidal aromatase inhibitors. Aminoglutethimide is used to decrease the production of sex hormones (estrogen in women or testosterone in men) and suppress the growth of tumors that need sex hormones to grow.
  • aminoglycoside antibiotic -
    A type of antibiotic that works against many types of bacteria and includes streptomycin, gentamicin, and neomycin. Aminoglycosides are used to treat bacterial infections.
  • aminolevulinic acid -
    A drug used in photodynamic therapy that is absorbed by tumor cells; when exposed to light, it becomes active and kills the cancer cells.
  • Aminophylline
    Aminophylline is a bronchodilator drug combination that contains theophylline and ethylenediamine in 2:1 ratio.
  • Aminophylline (Theophylline) Injection
  • aminopterin -
    An anticancer drug that belongs to the family of drugs called antimetabolites.
  • Amiodarone
    Amiodarone is a class III antiarrhythmic agent used in the treatment of ventricular arrhythmias and the suppression of atrial and ventricular arrhythmias. The chemical name for amiodarone is 2-butyl-3-benzofuranyl 4-[2-(diethylamino)-ethoxyl]-3,5-diiodophenyl ketone hydrochloride.
  • Amiodarone Injection
  • Amiodarone Oral
  • Amish Health
  • Amitone
  • Amitriptyline
    Amitriptyline hydrochloride is an antidepressant drug from the tricyclic antidepressant group, which is sold under the trade names Elavil®, Tryptanol® or Endep®.
  • Amitriptyline Injection
  • AML -
    Acute myelogenous leukemia. A quickly progressing disease in which too many immature blood-forming cells are found in the blood and bone marrow. Also called acute myeloid leukemia or acute nonlymphocytic leukemia.
  • Amlexanox
  • Amlodipine
    Amlodipine besylate is the compound found in Norvasc, a long acting calcium channel blocker used as an anti-hypertensive. Its systematic name is (R.S.) 3-ethyl-5-methyl-2-( 2-aminoethoxymethyl )-4-( 2-chlorophenyl )-1,4-dihydro-6-methyl-3,5-pyridinedicarboxylate benzenesulphonate and its chemical formula is .63.
  • Amlodipine and Atorvastatin
  • Amlodipine and Benazepril
  • Ammonia
    Ammonia is a chemical compound with the formula 3, since its molecule has a nitrogen atom with three hydrogen atoms all singly covalently bonded to the nitrogen as shown in the image at right. At standard temperature and pressure, ammonia is a gas. This gas is toxic and corrosive to some materials and has a characteristic pungent odor.
  • Ammonium Chloride Injection
  • Ammonium Choride Oral
  • Ammonium Lactate Topical
  • Amnesia
    Amnesia is a condition in which memory is disturbed. The causes of amnesia are organic or functional. Organic causes include damage to the brain, through trauma or disease, or use of certain (generally sedative) drugs. Functional causes are psychological factors, such as defense mechanisms. Hysterical post-traumatic amnesia is an example of this. Amnesia may also be spontaneous, in the case of transient global amnesia. ...
  • Amniotic constriction bands
  • Amobarbital
    Barbiturates are drugs that act as central nervous system (CNS) depressants, and by virtue of this they produce a wide spectrum of effects, from mild sedation to anesthesia. Some are also used as anticonvulsants.
  • amonafide -
    A substance that is being studied in the treatment of cancer. It belongs to the families of drugs called topoisomerase inhibitors and intercalating agents.
  • Amox-clav
  • Amoxapine
    Amoxapine (Asendin®; Asendis®; Defanyl®; Demolox®; Moxadil®) is a tricyclic antidepressant of the dibenzoxazepine class. It is used in the treatment of depression, panic disorders and bipolar disorder.
  • amoxicillin -
    An antibiotic drug used to treat infection. It belongs to the family of drugs called penicillins or penicillin derivatives.
  • Amoxicillin and Clavulanate Potassium
  • Amoxicillin and Clavulanate Potassium Extended Release
  • Amoxicillin and Clavulanate Potassium Oral Suspension
  • Amoxicillin Oral Suspension
  • Amoxil Oral Suspension
  • Amphadase
  • Amphetamine Abuse
    Amphetamine, also known as speed, is a synthetic drug originally studied (and still used) as an appetite suppressant. It was first synthesized in 1887 by the German Chemist L. Edeleano, which he called "phenylisopropylamine". Amphetamine and its derivatives (amphetamines) are part of a broader class of compounds called phenethylamines.
  • Amphetamine and Dextroamphetamine
  • Amphetamine and Dextroamphetamine ER
  • Amphocin
  • Amphojel Suspension
  • amphotericin B -
    A drug used in the treatment of infections caused by fungi. It belongs to the family of drugs called antifungals.
  • Amphotericin B can cause kidney impairment and severely unpleasant side effects.
  • Amphotericin B Injection
  • Amphotericin B Lipid Complex Injection
  • Amphotericin B Suspension Oral
  • Amphotericin B Topical
  • Amphotericin Suspension Oral
  • Ampicillin
    Ampicillin (C16H18N3O4S ; CAS No.: 69-53-4) is an aminopenicillin and, as such, is a broad-spectrum antibiotic and has been used extensively to treat bacterial infections since 1961. It is suspected to cause certain types of cancer in animals, including humans. Belonging to the group of beta-lactam antibiotics, ampicillin is able to penetrate Gram-negative bacteria. It inhibits the third and final stage of bacterial cell wall synthesis, which ultimately leads to cell lysis.
  • Ampicillin Oral Suspension
  • Ampicillin Sodium and Sulbactam Sodium Injection
  • Ampicillin Sodium Injection
  • Amprenavir Oral Solution
  • ampulla -
    A sac-like enlargement of a canal or duct.
  • ampulla of Vater -
    An enlargement of the ducts from the liver and pancreas at the point where they enter the small intestine.
  • amputation - am-pyoo-TAY-shun
    Surgery to remove part or all of a limb or appendage.
  • amsacrine -
    An anticancer drug that belongs to the family of drugs called topoisomerase inhibitors.
  • Amyl Nitrite
    The chemical compound amyl nitrite (or isoamyl nitrite) is an Alkyl nitrite.It has a characteristic penetrating odour, and produces marked effects on the human body when its vapour is inhaled. It acts as a vasodilator (expanding blood vessels and thus lowering blood pressure) and finds applications in medicine in the treatment of heart disease such as angina. Amyl nitrite is also used to treat cyanide poisoning. ...
  • amylase - AM-il-aze
    An enzyme that helps the body digest starches.
  • amyloidosis -
    A group of diseases in which protein is deposited in specific organs (localized amyloidosis) or throughout the body (systemic amyloidosis). Amyloidosis may be either primary (with no known cause) or secondary (caused by another disease, including some types of cancer). Generally, primary amyloidosis affects the nerves, skin, tongue, joints, heart, and liver; secondary amyloidosis often affects the spleen, kidneys, liver, and adrenal glands.
  • Amyloidosis and Kidney Disease
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis
    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a progressive disease that affects the control of muscle movement by damaging specialized nerve cells (motor neurons) in the spinal cord and the part of the brain that is connected to the spinal cord (brain stem). Most cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis are sporadic, which means there is no previous family history of this disorder, and the cause may not be genetic. The different types of inherited amyotrophic lateral sclerosis are distinguished by genetic cause, pattern of inheritance, age when symptoms begin, and how quickly the disease progresses. Genetic changes are related to the following types of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, type 1 amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, type 2 amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, type 4 Additional types of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis have been reported, but the responsible mutations have not been adequately described. The first signs of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis may be so subtle that they are overlooked. The earliest symptoms include muscle twitching, cramping, stiffness, or weakness. Speech may become slurred, and later there is difficulty chewing or swallowing. The muscles become weaker as the disease progresses, and arms and legs begin to look thinner as muscle tissue wastes away (atrophies). Individuals with this disorder lose their strength and the ability to walk and use their hands and arms. In late stages of the disease, breathing becomes difficult because the muscles of the respiratory system weaken. Most people with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis die from respiratory failure, usually from 3 to 15 years after the onset of symptoms.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, type 2
    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, type 2, is a juvenile-onset disorder that affects the control of muscle movement by damaging specialized nerve cells (motor neurons) in the brain and spinal cord. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, type 2 is a subtype of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Symptoms of type 2 amyotrophic lateral sclerosis usually begin in early childhood or adolescence and slowly worsen for 10 to 15 years. Typical symptoms include muscle weakness and twitching, stiff or rigid muscles that can interfere with movement or speech, repetitive jerky motions, and unusual posturing such as carrying the shoulder, arm, wrist, or fingers at an abnormal angle. Some individuals with this disorder experience periods of uncontrolled weeping or laughter.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, type 4
    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, type 4, is a juvenile-onset disorder that affects the control of muscle movement by damaging specialized nerve cells (motor neurons) in the brain and spinal cord. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, type 4 is a subtype of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Signs and symptoms of type 4 amyotrophic lateral sclerosis typically begin before the age of 25 years and slowly progress over several decades. Difficulty walking is often the initial symptom, followed by weakness and wasting of muscles in the hands and feet. Symptoms vary widely, from individuals with mild walking abnormalities to those who become wheelchair-bound and lose the use of their hands by their 40s or 50s.
  • ANA
    The three-letter abbreviation ANA can stand for:* All Nippon Airways.* anti-nuclear antibody.* American Numismatic Association.* Athens News Agency.* American Nurses Association.* Anaheim Angels.* Albanian National Army.* Afghan National Army.
  • Ana-Guard
  • anagrelide - an-AG-re-lide
    A drug that is used to decrease the number of platelets in the blood in order to prevent blood clotting.
  • anakinra - an-a-KIN-ra
    A substance that is used to treat rheumatoid arthritis, and is being studied in the treatment of cancer. Anakinra blocks the action of interleukin 1 (IL-1). It belongs to the family of drugs called interleukin receptor antagonists. Also called Kinaret®.
  • anal -
    Having to do with the anus, which is the posterior opening of the large bowel.
  • Anal and Rectal Problems
  • Anal fissure
    An anal fissure is an unnatural crack or tear in the skin of the anal canal. Anal fissures may be noticed by bright red anal bleeding on the ...
  • Anal Fissures
    Splits in the lining membrane of the anus. They can cause minor bleeding. Avoiding becoming constipated and gently carrying out bowel emptying can help to prevent them. If anal fissures develop, medical treatment may be needed.
  • Anal fistula
    An anal fistula is an abnormal connection between the epithelialised surface of the anal canal and (usually) the perianal skin.
  • Anal itching
  • Anal Warts
    Genital warts (or condyloma) is a very contagious sexually transmitted disease. Caused by some variants of the Human papillomavirus, typically HPV 6 and HPV 11, it is spread during oral, genital, or anal sex with an infected partner. About two-thirds of people who have sexual contact with a partner with genital warts will develop warts, usually within three months of contact.
  • analgesic -
    A drug that reduces pain. Analgesics include aspirin, acetaminophen, and ibuprofen.
  • Analgesic nephropathy
    Analgesic nephropathy is injury to the kidney caused by analgesic medications such as aspirin, phenacetin, and paracetamol. ...
  • Analgesic Nephropathy: Painkillers and the Kidneys
  • analog -
    In chemistry, a substance that is similar, but not identical, to another.
  • Analpram HC
  • Ananas comosus
    The pineapple (Ananas comosus) is a tropical plant and its fruit, native to Brazil, Bolivia, and Paraguay. The plant is a bromeliad (family Bromeliaceae), a short, herbaceous perennial with 30 or more long, spined and pointed leaves surrounding a thick stem. The fruit was named "pineapple" because of its resemblance to a pine cone. The native Tupi word for the fruit was anana, meaning "excellent fruit." Hummingbirds are its natural pollinators.
  • anaphylactic shock -
    A severe and sometimes life-threatening immune system reaction to an antigen that a person has been previously exposed to. The reaction may include itchy skin, edema, collapsed blood vessels, fainting, and difficulty in breathing.
  • Anaphylaxis (life-threatening allergic reaction)
    Anaphylaxis is an acute systemic (multi-system) and very severe Type I Hypersensitivity allergic reaction in humans and other mammals. The term comes from the Greek words ανα ana (against) and φύλαξις phylaxis (protection). ...
  • Anaphylaxis (life-threatening)
    Anaphylaxis is an acute systemic (multi-system) and very severe Type I Hypersensitivity allergic reaction in humans and other mammals. The term comes from the Greek words ανα ana (against) and φύλαξις phylaxis (protection). ...
  • anaplastic - an-ah-PLAS-tik
    A term used to describe cancer cells that divide rapidly and have little or no resemblance to normal cells.
  • anaplastic large cell lymphoma -
    An aggressive (rapidly progressing) type of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma that is usually of the T-cell type. The cancer cells express a marker called CD30 or Ki-1 on the surface, and may appear in the lymph nodes, skin, bones, soft tissues, lungs, or liver.
  • anaplastic thyroid cancer - an-a-PLAS-tik
    A rare, aggressive type of thyroid cancer in which the malignant (cancer) cells look very different from normal thyroid cells.
  • Anaplex HD liquid
  • Anaspaz
  • anastomosis - an-AS-ta-MO-sis
    A procedure to connect healthy sections of tubular structures in the body after the diseased portion has been surgically removed.
  • anastrozole -
    An anticancer drug that is used to decrease estrogen production and suppress the growth of tumors that need estrogen to grow. It belongs to the family of drugs called nonsteroidal aromatase inhibitors.
  • Anatomy of the Kidneys
  • Anatomy of the Urinary System
  • Anbesol Oral Gel
  • Ancef
    Cefazolin is an antibiotic in the chemical family of Cephalosporin.
  • Andehist DM Drops
  • Andehist Drops
  • Andehist NR Syrup
  • Andersen-Tawil syndrome
    Andersen-Tawil syndrome, also called Andersen syndrome and Long QT syndrome 7 is a form of long QT syndrome. It is a rare genetic disorder, and is inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern.
  • Andorra
    The Principality of Andorra (Catalan: Principat d'Andorra, French: Principauté d'Andorre) is a small, landlocked principality in southwestern Europe, located in the eastern Pyrenees mountains and bordered by France and Spain. Once isolated, it is currently a prosperous country mainly because of tourism and its status as a tax haven. Andorra is also part of the Catalan Countries and is one of the European microstates.
  • Androderm
  • androgen - AN-dro-jen
    A type of hormone that promotes the development and maintenance of male sex characteristics.
  • androgen ablation -
    Treatment to suppress or block the production of male hormones. Androgen suppression is achieved by surgical removal of the testicles, by taking female sex hormones, or by taking other drugs (antiandrogens). Also called androgen suppression.
  • Androgen insensitivity syndrome
    Androgen insensitivity syndrome is an inherited condition that affects sexual development before birth and during puberty. People with this condition are genetically male, with one X and one Y chromosome. Because their bodies are unable to respond to certain hormones (called androgens), they may have mostly female sexual characteristics or signs of both male and female sexual development. Complete androgen insensitivity syndrome occurs when the body cannot use androgens at all. Partial or mild androgen insensitivity syndrome results when tissues are partially sensitive to the effects of androgens.
  • androgen suppression -
    Treatment to suppress or block the production of male hormones. Androgen suppression is achieved by surgical removal of the testicles, by taking female sex hormones, or by taking other drugs, antiandrogens. Also called androgen ablation.
  • androgen-independent -
    Describes the ability of tumor cells to grow in the absence of androgens (hormones that promote the development and maintenance of male sex characteristics). Many early prostate cancers require androgens for growth, but advanced prostate cancers are often androgen-independent.
  • Androlone-D
  • anecdotal report -
    An incomplete description of the medical and treatment history of one or more patients. Anecdotal reports may be published in places other than peer-reviewed, scientific journals.
  • anemia - a-NEE-mee-a
    A condition in which the number of red blood cells is below normal.
  • Anemia - B12 deficiency
  • Anemia in Kidney Disease and Dialysis
  • Anemia of chronic disease
    Anemia of chronic disease, increasingly referred to as "anemia of inflammation", is a form of anemia seen in chronic illness, e.g. from chronic ...
  • Anestacon
  • anesthesia - an-es-THEE-zha
    Drugs or substances that cause loss of feeling or awareness. Local anesthetics cause loss of feeling in a part of the body. General anesthetics put the person to sleep.
  • anesthesiologist -
    A doctor who specializes in giving drugs or other agents to prevent or relieve pain during surgery or other procedures being done in the hospital.
  • anesthetic - an-es-THET-ik
    A substance that causes loss of feeling or awareness. Local anesthetics cause loss of feeling in a part of the body. General anesthetics put the person to sleep.
  • anetholtrithione -
    A substance that is being studied in the treatment of cancer.
  • Aneurysm in the brain
  • Angelica root -
    The root of any of a group of herbs called Angelica. It has been used in some cultures to treat certain medical problems, including gastrointestinal problems such as loss of appetite, feelings of fullness, and gas.
  • Angelica sinensis
    Angelica sinensis is a herb from the family Apiaceae. Its root is commonly known as dong quai or danggui () and is widely used in Chinese traditional medicine to treat gynecological ailments, fatigue, mild anemia and high blood pressure. Dong quai has analgesic, anti-inflammatory, antispasmodic and sedative effects. The plant's phytochemicals are comprised of coumarins, phytosterols, polysaccharides and flavonoids.
  • Angelman syndrome
    Angelman syndrome is a complex genetic disorder that affects the brain and nervous system. Characteristic features of the condition include developmental delay or mental retardation, severe speech impairment, and problems with movement and balance (ataxia). People with Angelman syndrome typically have a happy, excitable demeanor with frequent smiling, excessive laughter, and hand-flapping movements. Some affected individuals also have unusually fair skin and light-colored hair.
  • Angiitis
    inflammation of a blood vessel or lymph duct
  • Angina Pectoris
    Angina pectoris (Latin for "chest constriction") is the result of a lack of oxygen supply to the heart muscle, due to a reduced blood flow around the heart's blood vessels. This lack of oxygen to the heart is known as myocardial ischemia. Angina pectoris is a common symptom of myocardial ischemia (most often chest pain). People with coronary artery disease are most often affected by angina.
  • Angiodysplasia of the colon
  • Angioedema
    Angioedema (BE: angiooedema), also known by its eponym Quincke's edema and the older term angioneurotic edema, is the rapid swelling (edema) of the skin, mucosa and submucosal tissues. If it proceeds rapidly, it can lead to airway obstruction and suffocation, and it should therefore be treated as a medical emergency.
  • Angioedema and hives
  • angiogenesis - an-gee-o-GEN-eh-sis
    Blood vessel formation. Tumor angiogenesis is the growth of blood vessels from surrounding tissue to a solid tumor. This is caused by the release of chemicals by the tumor.
  • angiogenesis inhibitor -
    A substance that may prevent the formation of blood vessels. In anticancer therapy, an angiogenesis inhibitor prevents the growth of blood vessels from surrounding tissue to a solid tumor.
  • angiogram - AN-jee-o-gram
    An x-ray of blood vessels; the person receives an injection of dye to outline the vessels on the x-ray.
  • angiography - an-jee-AH-gra-fee
    A procedure to x-ray blood vessels. The blood vessels can be seen because of an injection of a dye that shows up in the x-ray pictures.
  • angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma -
    An aggressive (rapidly progressing) type of T-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma marked by enlarged lymph nodes and hypergammaglobulinemia (increased antibodies in the blood). Other symptoms may include a skin rash, fever, weight loss, or night sweats.
  • angiosarcoma - AN-jee-o-sar-KO-ma
    A type of cancer that begins in the cells that line blood vessels or lymph vessels. Cancer that begins in blood vessels is called hemangiosarcoma. Cancer that begins in lymph vessels is called lymphangiosarcoma.
  • angiostatin -
    A protein normally made by the body. It can also be made in the laboratory, and is being studied in the treatment of cancer. Angiostatin may prevent the growth of new blood vessels from the surrounding tissue to a solid tumor. It belongs to the family of drugs called angiogenesis inhibitors.
  • angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor -
    ACE inhibitor. A type of drug that is used to lower blood pressure. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors belong to the family of drugs called antihypertensives.
  • Angkak
  • Angola
    Angola is a country in southwestern Africa bordering Namibia, Congo-Kinshasa, and Zambia, and with a west coast along the Atlantic Ocean. The exclave province Cabinda has a border with Congo-Brazzaville. A former Portuguese colony, it has considerable natural resources, among which oil and diamonds are the most relevant. The country is nominally a democracy and is formally named the Republic of Angola (Portuguese: República de Angola).
  • Anguilla (U.K.)
    Anguilla, or Snake Island, is the most northerly of the Leeward Islands in the Lesser Antilles, and is a British overseas territory with Queen Elizabeth II as its head of state, represented by a Governor. The locally elected Chief Minister of the island serves as head of government. The United Nations Committee on Decolonization includes Anguilla on the United Nations list of Non-Self-Governing Territories.
  • Anhidrosis
    Anhidrosis means lack of sweating.
  • anhydrovinblastine -
    An anticancer drug that belongs to the family of drugs called mitotic inhibitors.
  • anidulafungin -
    A drug that is used to treat infections caused by fungi. It belongs to the family of drugs called antifungals.
  • Animal Assistants
  • Animal Bites
  • Animal Health
  • animal model -
    An animal with a disease either the same as or like a disease in humans. Animal models are used to study the development and progression of diseases and to test new treatments before they are given to humans. Animals with transplanted human cancers or other tissues are called xenograft models.
  • Animal Research
  • Animal Sports
  • Animal-Related Diseases
  • Anistreplase
    (an·is·trep·lase) (an-is-trep¢l[amacr]s) a thrombolytic agent, primarily used to clear coronary vessel occlusions after myocardial infarction; administered intravenously.
  • Ankle
    In anatomy, the ankle is the part of the lower limb that is located between the foot and the leg, and is actually comprised of two separate joints: the talocrural joint (or "true" ankle joint) and the subtalar joint. The talocrural joint connects the distal ends of the tibia and fibula with the proximal end of the talus and is responsible for dorsiflexion and plantar flexion of the foot. The subtalar joint connects the talus with the calcaneus and is responible for medial and lateral rotation.
  • Ankle Injuries and Disorders
  • Ankle Pain
    Pain in the ankle , a "hinged" joint. Ankle pain is commonly due to a sprain or tendinitis. ...
  • annamycin -
    A substance that is being studied in the treatment of cancer. It belongs to the family of drugs called anthracycline antibiotics.
  • Anne Collins Diet
  • Annular pancreas
    Annular pancreas is a rare condition in which the second part of the duodenum is surrounded by a ring of pancreatic tissue continuous with the ...
  • Anolor
  • Anomalous left coronary artery
  • Anoquan
  • Anorchia
    Anorchia (or anorchism) is a medical condition where both testes are absent at birth. Within a few weeks of fertilization, the embryo develops rudimentary sex organs, which are crucial to the development of the reproductive system. ...
  • Anorectal abscess
  • Anorex
  • anorexia -
    An abnormal loss of the appetite for food. Anorexia can be caused by cancer, AIDS, a mental disorder (i.e., anorexia nervosa), or other diseases.
  • Anoxemia
    abnormally low oxygen content in arterial blood
  • Ansaid
    flurbiprofen: a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (trade name Ansaid) that is administered only orally
  • ansamycin -
    An anticancer drug that belongs to the family of drugs called antineoplastic antibiotics.
  • Antagon
  • antagonist -
    In medicine, a substance that stops the action or effect of another substance. For example, a drug that blocks the stimulating effect of estrogen on a tumor cell is called an estrogen receptor antagonist.
  • Anterior Compartment Syndrome
    condition in which swelling within the anterior compartment of the lower leg jeopardizes the viability of muscles, nerves and arteries that serve ...
  • Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury
  • anterior mediastinotomy - MEE-dee-a-stin-AH-toe-mee
    A procedure in which a tube is inserted into the chest to view the tissues and organs in the area between the lungs and between the breastbone and heart. The tube is inserted through an incision next to the breastbone. This procedure is usually used to get a tissue sample from the lymph nodes on the left side of the chest. Also called the Chamberlain procedure.
  • anterior mediastinum -
    The area in the front part of the chest between the lungs. Also called prevascular space.
  • anthracenedione -
    An anticancer drug that belongs to the family of drugs called anticancer antibiotics.
  • anthraquinone -
    A type of anticancer drug.
  • Anthroposophical medicine
    (anthroposophically-extended medicine, anthroposophical therapeutics): Medical phase of anthroposophy, the occult philosophy of Rudolf Steiner (1861-1925). Anthroposophical medicine, a purported "extension of practical medicine," encompasses curative eurythmy. According to anthroposophy, the human organism consists of a physical body, a vegetal "etheric" body, an animalistic "astral" or "soul" body, and an "ego" or "spirit. ...
  • anti-CEA antibody -
    An antibody against carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), a protein present on certain types of cancer cells.
  • anti-idiotype vaccine -
    A vaccine made of antibodies that see other antibodies as the antigen and bind to it. Anti-idiotype vaccines can stimulate the body to produce antibodies against tumor cells.
  • anti-inflammatory -
    Having to do with reducing inflammation.
  • Anti-Inflammatory Diets
  • Anti-inflammatory Medications
  • Anti-inhibitor Coagulant Complex
  • antiandrogen - an-tee-AN-dro-jen
    A drug used to block the production or interfere with the action of male sex hormones.
  • antiandrogen therapy -
    Treatment with drugs used to block production or interfere with the action of male sex hormones.
  • antiangiogenesis -
    Prevention of the growth of new blood vessels.
  • antiangiogenic -
    Having to do with reducing the growth of new blood vessels.
  • Antianxiety Medications
  • Antiarrhythmic Medications
  • Antiben Ear Drops
  • antibiotic - an-tih-by-AH-tik
    A drug used to treat infections caused by bacteria and other microorganisms.
  • Antibiotic-associated diarrhea
    Loose, frequent stools that may result from taking antibiotic medications.
  • antibody - AN-tih-BOD-ee
    A type of protein made by certain white blood cells in response to a foreign substance (antigen). Each antibody can bind to only a specific antigen. The purpose of this binding is to help destroy the antigen. Antibodies can work in several ways, depending on the nature of the antigen. Some antibodies destroy antigens directly. Others make it easier for white blood cells to destroy the antigen.
  • Antibody Tests
    are specifically designed for the routine testing of HIV in adults, are inexpensive, and are very accurate. If a person does not have not a realistic risk of infection, then these tests are not necessary.
  • antibody therapy -
    Treatment with an antibody, a substance that can directly kill specific tumor cells or stimulate the immune system to kill tumor cells.
  • anticachexia - AN-tee-ka-KEK-see-a
    Describes a drug or effect that works against cachexia (loss of body weight and muscle mass).
  • anticancer antibiotic -
    A type of anticancer drug that blocks cell growth by interfering with DNA, the genetic material in cells. Also called an antitumor antibiotic or antineoplastic antibiotic.
  • Anticancer Drugs
  • anticarcinogenic - AN-tee-KAR-sin-o-JEN-ik
    Having to do with preventing or delaying the development of cancer.
  • Anticholinergic Agents
    An anticholinergic agent is a member of a class of pharmaceutical compounds which serve to reduce the effects mediated by acetylcholine in the central nervous system and peripheral nervous system.
  • anticoagulant -
    A drug that helps prevent blood clots from forming. Also called a blood thinner.
  • Anticoagulation
    An anticoagulant is a substance that prevents coagulation; that is, it stops blood from clotting. A group of pharmaceuticals called anticoagulants can be used in vivo as a medication for thrombotic disorders. ...
  • anticonvulsant - AN-tee-kon-VUL-sant
    A drug that prevents, reduces, or stops convulsions or seizures.
  • Anticonvulsants
    The anticonvulsants, sometimes also called antiepileptics, belong to a diverse group of pharmaceuticals used in prevention of the occurrence of epileptic seizures.
  • antidepressant -
    A drug used to treat depression.
  • Antidepressant Medications
  • Antidepressant Medications, SSRIs
  • Antidepressant Medications, Tricyclics
  • Antidiarrheal Medications
  • antiemetic -
    A drug that prevents or reduces nausea and vomiting.
  • antiestrogen -
    A substance that blocks the activity of estrogens, the family of hormones that promote the development and maintenance of female sex characteristics.
  • Antiestrogens
  • antifolate -
    A substance that blocks the activity of folic acid. Antifolates are used to treat cancer. Also called folate antagonist.
  • antifungal -
    A drug that treats infections caused by fungi.
  • Antifungal Medications
  • antigen -
    A substance that causes the immune system to make a specific immune response.
  • antigen-presenting cell -
    APC. A cell that shows antigen on its surface to other cells of the immune system. This is an important part of an immune response.
  • antigen-presenting cell vaccine -
    A vaccine made of antigens and antigen-presenting cells (APCs). Also called APC vaccine.
  • antiglobulin test -
    A laboratory test to identify antibodies that can bind to the surface of red blood cells or platelets and destroy them. This test is used to diagnose certain blood disorders in which patients make antibodies to their own red blood cells or platelets. It is also used to determine blood type. Also called a Coomb's test.
  • Antigua and Barbuda
    Antigua and Barbuda is an island nation located in the eastern Caribbean Sea on the boundary with the Atlantic Ocean.  Antigua and Barbuda are part of the Lesser Antilles archipelago with the island of Guadeloupe to the south, Montserrat to the southwest, Saint Kitts and Nevis to the west and Saint Barthélemy to the northwest.
  • Antihemophilic Factor (Human or Recombinant)
    Factor VIII (FVIII) is an essential clotting factor. The lack of normal FVIII causes Hemophilia A, an inherited bleeding disorder.
  • Antihistamines
    An antihistamine is a drug which serves to reduce or eliminate effects mediated by histamine, an endogenous chemical mediator released during allergic reactions, through action at the histamine receptor. Only agents where the main therapeutic effect is mediated by negative modulation of histamine receptors are termed antihistamines - other agents may have antihistaminergic action but are not true antihistamines.
  • antihormone therapy -
    Treatment with drugs, surgery, or radiation in order to block the production or action of a hormone. Antihormone therapy may be used in cancer treatment because certain hormones are able to stimulate the growth of some types of tumors.
  • Antilirium
  • Antimalarial Medications
  • antimetabolite -
    A drug that is very similar to natural chemicals in a normal biochemical reaction in cells but different enough to interfere with the normal division and functions of cells.
  • Antimicrobial Resistance
    Antimicrobial resistance is the result of microbes changing in ways that reduce or eliminate the effectiveness of drugs, chemicals, or other agents to cure or prevent infections.
  • antimicrotubule agent -
    A drug that inhibits cell growth by stopping cell division. Antimicrotubule agents are used as treatments for cancer. Also called antimitotic agents, mitotic inhibitors, and taxanes. Docetaxel and paclitaxel are antimicrotubule agents.
  • Antiminth
  • antimitotic agent -
    A drug that inhibits cell growth by stopping cell division. Antimitotic agents are used as treatments for cancer. Also called antimicrotubule agents, mitotic inhibitors, and taxanes. Docetaxel and paclitaxel are antimitotic agents.
  • antineoplastic -
    A substance that blocks the formation of neoplasms (growths that may become cancerous).
  • antineoplastic antibiotic -
    A type of anticancer drug that blocks cell growth by interfering with DNA, the genetic material in cells. Also called an anticancer antibiotic or antitumor antibiotic.
  • antineoplaston -
    A substance isolated from normal human blood and urine that is being tested as a type of treatment for some tumors and AIDS.
  • antioxidant - an-tee-OKS-i-dent
    A substance that prevents damage caused by free radicals. Free radicals are highly reactive chemicals that often contain oxygen. They are produced when molecules are split to give products that have unpaired electrons. This process is called oxidation.
  • antiparasitic -
    A drug used to treat infections caused by bacteria and parasites. It is also used in the treatment of some cancers.
  • Antiphospholipids
  • Antipsychotic Medications
    various forms of medications that are often very effective in treating certain symptoms of psychosis, such as hallucinations and delusions which, when used appropriately, improve the patient's quality of life and their safety. Examples of these medications are as follows: Haldol; Mellaril; Risperdal; Seroquel; Geodon; Abilify; Thorazine; Prolixin; and Zyprexa.
  • Antipyrine and Benzocaine Ear Drops
  • antiretroviral therapy -
    Treatment with drugs that inhibit the ability of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) or other types of retroviruses to multiply in the body.
  • Antiretrovirals
    A class of drugs that inhibit retroviruses like HIV.
  • antisense c-fos -
    Synthetic genetic material that may slow or stop the growth of cancer cells.
  • Antisocial personality disorder
    Antisocial personality disorder (APD) is a personality disorder which is often characterised by antisocial and impulsive behaviour. APD is generally (if controversially) considered to be the same as, or similar to, the disorder that was previously known as psychopathic or sociopathic personality disorder. Approximately 3% of men and 1% of women have some form of antisocial personality disorder (source: DSM-IV).
  • Antispas Injection
  • Antispasmodic Elixer
  • Antithrombin
    Antithrombin is a small molecule that inactivates several enzymes of the coagulation system. Its affinity for these molecules (i.e. its effectivity) is enhanced by heparin.
  • Antithrombin III
    Antithrombin is a small molecule that inactivates several enzymes of the coagulation system. Its affinity for these molecules (i.e. its effectivity) is enhanced by heparin.
  • antithymocyte globulin - AN-tee-THIGH-mo-site GLOB-yoo-lin
    A protein used to reduce the risk of or to treat graft-versus-host disease.
  • Antithymocyte Globulin Injection
  • antituberculosis - AN-tee-too-ber-kyoo-LOW-sis
    Describes a drug or effect that works against tuberculosis (a contagious bacterial infection that usually affects the lungs).
  • antitumor antibiotic -
    A type of anticancer drug that blocks cell growth by interfering with DNA, the genetic material in cells. Also called an anticancer antibiotic or antineoplastic antibiotic.
  • Antiulcer Medications
  • Antivert
    meclizine: an antihistamine (trade name Antivert) used to treat or prevent motion sickness
  • antiviral -
    A drug used to treat infections caused by viruses.
  • Antiviral Agents
  • Antizol
  • Antrizine
  • Anturane Capsules
  • AnturaneTablets
  • Anucort-HC
  • Anumed HC
  • anus - AY-nus
    The opening of the rectum to the outside of the body.
  • Anusol
    Anusol is a medication that can be used to treat hemorrhoids (also known as piles). The Anusol range includes creams, ointments, and the ...
  • Anusol-HC
  • Anxiety disorder
    Anxiety disorder is a blanket term covering several different forms of fear, phobia and nervous condition, that come on suddenly and prevent pursuing normal daily routines including: * General anxiety disorder* Social anxiety, sometimes known as "social phobia" or "social anxiety disorder" (SAD)* Specific phobias* Obsessive-compulsive disorder* Agoraphobia* Claustrophobia* Panic disorder* Separation anxiety disorder* Post-traumatic stress disorder
  • Anxiety, Depression and Other Nervous Disorders
  • anxiolytic -
    A drug used in the treatment of anxiety and muscle spasms.
  • Anzemet Injection
  • aorta - a-OR-tuh
    The largest artery in the body. It carries oxygen-rich blood away from the heart to vessels that reach the rest of the body.
  • Aortic aneurysm
    An aortic aneurysm is a general term for any localized dilatation or aneurysm of the aorta, usually representing an underlying weakness in the wall of the aorta at that location. This physical change in the aortic diameter can occur secondary to an intrinsic defect in the protein construction of the aortic wall, trauma, infection, or due to progressive destruction of aortic proteins by enzymes. ...
  • Aortic arch syndrome
    Takayasu's arteritis (also known as "Aortic arch syndrome," and "Pulseless disease") is an inflammatory disease with an unknown cause. ...
  • Aortic dissection
    Aortic dissection is a tear in the wall of the aorta that causes blood to flow between the layers of the wall of the aorta and force the layers ...
  • Aortic insufficiency
    Aortic insufficiency (AI), also known as aortic regurgitation (AR), is the leaking of the aortic valve of the heart that causes blood to flow in ...
  • Aortic rupture
    Traumatic aortic rupture, also called traumatic aortic disruption or transection, is a condition in which the aorta, the largest artery in the ...
  • Aortic rupture causing rapid blood loss, shock
  • Aortic Stenosis
    Aortic valve stenosis (AS) is a heart condition caused by the incomplete opening of the aortic valve.
  • Aortic Valve Insufficiency
    Aortic insufficiency (AI), also known as aortic regurgitation (AR), is the leaking of the aortic valve of the heart that causes blood to flow in ...
  • Aortic valve regurgitation
  • Aortic valve stenosis
    Aortic valve stenosis (AS) is a heart condition caused by the incomplete opening of the aortic valve.
  • Aortopulmonary window
    The aortopulmonary window is a small space between the aortic arch and the pulmonary artery that is visible in the lateral chest radiograph. ...
  • APAP and Codeine
  • APAP and Propoxyphene
  • APC -
    Antigen-presenting cell. A cell that shows antigen on its surface to other cells of the immune system. This is an important part of an immune response.
  • APC vaccine -
    A vaccine made of antigens and antigen-presenting cells (APCs). Also called antigen-presenting cell vaccine.
  • APC8015 -
    Immune system cells that are collected from a patient with prostate cancer and treated in the laboratory with a molecule found on prostate cells. The treated cells are being studied for their ability to stimulate the immune system to kill prostate cancer cells.
  • Apert syndrome
    Apert syndrome is a genetic disorder characterized by the premature fusion of certain bones of the skull (craniosynostosis), which prevents further growth of the skull and affects the shape of the head and face. In addition, a varied number of fingers and toes are fused together (syndactyly). Many of the characteristic facial features of Apert syndrome result from the premature fusion of the skull bones. The head is unable to grow normally, which leads to a sunken appearance in the middle of the face, bulging and wide-set eyes, a beaked nose, and an underdeveloped upper jaw leading to crowded teeth and other dental problems. Shallow eye sockets can cause vision problems. Hearing loss may be present. Recurrent ear infections are common and may be associated with cleft palate. Acne can be severe. Additionally, individuals with Apert syndrome have webbed or fused fingers and toes. The severity of the fusion varies; at a minimum, three digits on each hand and foot are fused together. In the most severe cases, all of the fingers and toes are fused. Intellectual development also varies, ranging from normal to mild or moderate mental retardation.
  • Aphasia in Adults: Recent Research
  • apheresis -
    A procedure in which blood is collected, part of the blood such as platelets or white blood cells is taken out, and the rest of the blood is returned to the donor. Also called pheresis.
  • Aphthasol
  • Aphthous ulcer
    A mouth ulcer or canker sore is a painful open sore inside the mouth caused by a break in the mucous membrane. The condition is also called aphthous stomatitis.
  • Apitherapy
    Apitherapy is the medical use of honeybee products. This can include the use of honey, pollen, propolis, royal jelly, and bee venom, but most commonly refers to use of bee venom, called bee venom therapy (BVT). Beekeepers have noted anecdotally that bee stings help arthritis, and other inflammatory and degenerative diseases. Recently there has been more interest in studying bee venom for other autoimmune diseases.
  • Apium graveolens
    Celery (Apium graveolens L.) is a vegetable, more specifically a biennial plant belonging to the order Umbelliferae (Apiales).
  • aplastic anemia -
    A condition in which the bone marrow is unable to produce blood cells.
  • aplidine -
    A substance that is being studied in the treatment of cancer. It is obtained from a marine organism.
  • Apnea of prematurity
    Apnea of prematurity is defined as cessation of breathing by a premature infant that lasts for more than 15 seconds and/or is accompanied by ...
  • Apo A
  • Apo B
  • Apo-feno-micro
  • apocrine gland -
    A gland that secretes a fluid that includes small parts of the gland’s apocrine cells. Sweat glands in the armpits and groin are apocrine glands.
  • ApoE Genotyping
  • Apolipo-protein E (apoe) Gene
  • apolizumab -
    A type of monoclonal antibody that is being studied as a treatment for hematologic (blood) cancers. Monoclonal antibodies are laboratory-produced substances that can locate and bind to cancer cells.
  • apoptosis - ap-o-TOE-sis
    A normal series of events in a cell that leads to its death.
  • Appendectomy
    An appendicectomy (or appendectomy) is the surgical removal of the vermiform appendix. This procedure is normally performed as an emergency procedure when the patient is suffering from acute appendicitis. In the absence of surgical facilities, intravenous antibiotics are used to delay or avoid the onset of sepsis; it is now recognised that many cases will resolve when treated conservatively. ...
  • appendix -
    A small, fingerlike pouch that sticks out from the cecum (the first part of the large intestine near the end of the small intestine).
  • Apple Cider Vinegar Diet
  • Applied kinesiology
    Applied kinesiology (AK) is a form of diagnostic kinesiology that is used as a primary feedback mechanism to examine how a personÂ’s body is functioning. Proponents say that when properly applied, the outcome of an AK diagnosis will determine the best form of therapy for the patient. Since AK draws together the core elements of many complementary therapies, it provides an interdisciplinary approach to health care. Discovered by Dr. George J. ...
  • Approval
    Approval voting is a voting system used for elections, in which each voter can vote for as many or as few candidates as the voter chooses. It is typically used for single-winner elections but can be extended to multiple winners. Approval voting is a limited form of range voting, where the range that voters are allowed to express is extremely constrained: accept or not. It was advocated in 1968 and 1977 by Guy Ottewell. The term "Approval voting" was first coined by Robert J. ...
  • Approximately one-half of patients with small tumors will get back useful hearing in the affected ear after surgery.
  • Apraclonidine
  • Apresoline Injection
  • Apri
    Comando presente praticamente in tutti i programmi che consente l'apertura di un determinato documento o di un altro programma.
  • Aprotinin
    An intravenously administered protein which helps prevent bleeding following cardiac surgery. It works by blocking the action of certain enzymes in the bloodstream which dissolve blood clots.
  • aPTT
    The partial thromboplastin time (PTT) or activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) is a commonly performed test for the system of coagulation, especially its intrinsic pathway. Apart from detecting abnormalities in blood clotting, it is also used to monitor the effectivity of treatment with heparin, a major anticoagulant.
  • Aquacare
  • Aquachloral Supprettes
  • AquaMEPHYTON
  • Aquaphyllin
  • Aquaphyllin Syrup
  • Aquatab C Tablets
  • Aquatab D
  • Aquatab DM
  • Aquatar
  • Aquatensen
  • aqueous -
    Having to do with water.
  • ARA-C Liposomal Injection
  • Arachnoid Cysts
  • Aralen Injection
  • Arcet
  • Archery
    Archery is the practice of using a bow to shoot arrows. Archery has historically been used in hunting and combat, and has become a precision sport.
  • Arctic Health
  • arctigenin -
    A substance found in certain plants, including burdock. It has shown antiviral and anticancer effects. Arctigenin belongs to a group of substances called lignans.
  • arctiin -
    A substance found in certain plants, including burdock. It has shown anticancer effects. Arctiin belongs to a group of substances called lignans.
  • Arctostaphylos uva-ursi
    Bearberries are three species of dwarf shrubs in the genus Arctostaphylos. Unlike the other species of Arctostaphylos (see Manzanita), they are adapted to arctic and sub-arctic climates, and have a circumpolar distribution in northern North America, Asia and Europe, one with a small highly disjunct population in Central America. The name bearberry derives from the edible fruit, said to be greatly enjoyed by bears. Other names include Kinnikinnick and Mealberry. ...
  • Arcus Senilis
    Arcus senilis (or arcus senilis corneae) is a white or gray opaque ring in the corneal margin (peripheral corneal opacity) present at birth or ...
  • Ardeparin Sodium Injection--No longer available
  • Arduan
  • Aredia
    medicine that inhibits bone resorption; used for treating high calcium content in blood associated with malignancy, and sometimes in bone pain palliation and to control osteoporosis prompted by hormonal therapy.
  • areola - a-REE-o-la
    The area of dark-colored skin on the breast that surrounds the nipple.
  • Argatroban
  • Argentina
    Argentina is a country in southern South America, situated between the Andes in the west and the southern Atlantic Ocean in the east. It is bordered by Paraguay and Bolivia in the north, Brazil and Uruguay in the northeast and Chile in the west. It's the second largest country of South America after Brazil and the 8th largest country in the world. ...
  • Argentine hemorrhagic fever
    hemorrhagic fever with neurological signs; caused by the Junin virus
  • Argesic-SA
  • arginine butyrate -
    A substance that is being studied in the treatment of cancer.
  • Argininosuccinic aciduria
    Argininosuccinic aciduria is an inherited disorder that causes ammonia to accumulate in the blood. Ammonia is toxic, especially to the nervous system, and argininosuccinic aciduria usually becomes evident in the first few days of life. An infant with argininosuccinic aciduria may seem lethargic or be unwilling to eat, have poorly-controlled breathing rate or body temperature, experience seizures or unusual body movements, or go into a coma. Complications from argininosuccinic aciduria may include developmental delay and mental retardation. Progressive liver damage, skin lesions, and brittle hair may also be seen. Immediate treatment and lifelong management (following a strict diet and using appropriate supplements) may prevent many of these complications. Occasionally, an individual may inherit a mild form of the disorder in which ammonia accumulates in the bloodstream only during periods of illness or other stress.
  • Aristocort
    triamcinolone: a synthetic corticosteroid (trade names Aristocort or Aristopak or Kenalog) used as an anti-inflammatory agent
  • Aristocort A
  • Aristocort Topical
  • Arizona
    Arizona was the 48th state admitted to the United States and is part of the Southwest United States. It is one of the Four Corners states, south and east of the Colorado River, bordering New Mexico, Utah, Nevada, California and Mexico, and touching Colorado. It is also the name of a US Battleship, the USS Arizona.
  • Arkansas
    Arkansas (pronounced ) is a southern state in the southern United States. The population according to the 2000 census was 2,673,400. Its U.S. postal abbreviation is AR, and its Associated Press abbreviation is Ark. It was admitted in 1836.
  • Arm
    ARM may stand for: Most likely:* ARM Ltd (originally Advanced RISC Machines)* ARM architecture CPU design or one of its derivatives developed by ARM Ltd (originally called The Acorn RISC Machine)* Adjustable rate mortgage* Annotated Reference Manual (C++)* Artificial rupture of membranes (see amniotic sac)* the ISO 3166-1 3-letter country code and an abbreviation for Armenia
  • Arm Exercises
  • Arm Injuries and Disorders
  • Arm Toners
  • Armenia
    The Republic of Armenia, or Armenia (Armenian:Հայաստան, Hayastan, Hayq), is a landlocked country in southern Caucasus, between the Black Sea and the Caspian Sea, bordered by Turkey to the west, Georgia to the north, Azerbaijan in the east and Iran (Persia) and the Naxçıvan exclave of Azerbaijan in the south. ...
  • Armour Thyroid
  • Arnica
    *Arnica viscosa Gray -- Mt. Shasta Arnica
  • Arnica montana
    Arnica montana is a species in genus Arnica, also known as Leopard's bane, Wolf's bane, and Mountain tobacco.
  • Arnot Revolutionary Weight Loss
  • aromatase inhibitor - a-ROW-ma-tays in-HIB-it-er
    A drug that prevents the formation of estradiol, a female hormone, by interfering with an aromatase enzyme. Aromatase inhibitors are used as a type of hormone therapy for postmenopausal women who have hormone-dependent breast cancer.
  • Arrhenoblastoma of ovary
  • arsenic -
    A poisonous chemical used to kill weeds and pests. Also used in cancer therapy.
  • arsenic trioxide -
    A substance that induces programmed cell death (apoptosis) in certain cancer cells. It belongs to the family of drugs called antineoplastics.
  • Art Therapies
  • Artane
    Artane (Ard Aidhin in Irish) is a suburb of Dublin, Ireland.
  • Artane Elixir
  • Arterial emboli
  • Arterial embolism
    A sudden interruption in arterial blood flow to an organ or body extremity. The blockage is caused by a blood clot or foreign object.
  • arterial embolization - ar-TEE-ree-al EM-bo-lih-ZAY-shun
    The blocking of an artery by a clot of foreign material. This can be done as treatment to block the flow of blood to a tumor.
  • Arteries
    Arteries are muscular tubes that carry blood flow away from the heart to the tissues and organs of the body ( by contrast, veins are the return path tubes).
  • Arteries, Hardening of
  • arteriogram - ar-TEER-ee-o-gram
    An x-ray of arteries; the person receives an injection of a dye that outlines the vessels on an x-ray.
  • arteriography - ar-TEE-ree-AH-gra-fee
    A procedure to x-ray arteries. The arteries can be seen because of an injection of a dye that outlines the vessels on an x-ray.
  • Arteriosclerosis of Extremities
  • Arteriosclerosis of the extremities
    Arteriosclerosis refers to a stiffening of arteries.
  • Arteriosclerosis, Coronary
  • Arteriosclerosis/Atherosclerosis
  • Arteriovenous malformation - cerebral
  • Arteritis
    Arteritis is inflammation of the walls of arteries, usually as a result of infection or auto-immune response.
  • Artha-G
  • arthritis -
    A disease that causes inflammation and pain in the joints.
  • Arthritis Diet
  • Arthritis in several joints
  • Arthritis, Osteo-
  • Arthritis, Rheumatoid
  • Arthrography
    A radiographic study in which a contrast material is injected into a joint space and x-rays are obtained and/or fluoroscopy is performed to study the internal structures of the joint. The radiographic examination must be conducted promptly after injection of the contrast material because it is rapidly absorbed. Single contrast examinations are typically performed on the hip, wrist, ankle, and elbow. ...
  • Arthropan
  • Arthrospira
  • Arthrospira plantensis
  • Arthrotec
  • Articaine and Epinephrine
  • Artificial Feeding
  • Artificial Tears Ointment
  • Arts therapies
  • Aruba
    Aruba is an island in the Caribbean Sea, just a short distance north of the Venezuelan Paraguaná Peninsula, and it forms a part of the Kingdom of the Netherlands. Unlike much of the Caribbean region, it has a dry climate and an arid, cactus-strewn landscape. This climate has helped tourism, however, as visitors to the island can reliably expect warm, sunny weather.
  • ASA and Oxycodone
  • asbestos - as-BES-tus
    A natural material that is made of tiny fibers. Asbestos can cause several serious diseases, including cancer.
  • ascites - ah-SYE-teez
    Abnormal build-up of fluid in the abdomen that may cause swelling. In late-stage cancer, tumor cells may be found in the fluid in the abdomen. Ascites also occurs in patients with liver disease.
  • Ascomp with Codeine
  • Ascorbic Acid
    Ascorbic acid is an organic acid with antioxidant properties. The L-enantiomer of ascorbic acid is commonly known as vitamin C. In 1937 the Nobel Prize for chemistry was awarded to Walter Haworth for his work in determining the structure of ascorbic acid, (It was shared with Paul Karrer, who received his award for work on vitamins), and the prize for Physiology or medicine that year went to Albert Szent-Györgyi for his studies of the biological functions of ascorbic acid.
  • Ascorbic Acid Injection
  • Ascorbic Acid Liquid
  • Asendin
  • Aseptic meningitis
    Aseptic meningitis, or sterile meningitis, is a condition in which the layers lining of the brain, or meninges, become inflamed and a pyogenic ...
  • Aseptic necrosis
  • Asherman syndrome
    Asherman's syndrome, also called "uterine synechiae" or intrauterine adhesions, presents a condition characterized by the presence of scars within ...
  • Asia, East
  • Asia, South
  • Asia, Southeast
  • Asian American
    An Asian American is a person of Asian ancestry or origin who was born in or is an immigrant to the United States.
  • Asian American/ Pacific Islander Women
  • Asian Language Materials
  • Asian-American Health
  • Asklepios
    Asklepios, (Latinate spelling Asclepius) the Greek god of medicine treated the sick with the help of his daughters, Hygeia and Panacea.
  • Asmalix
  • Asmalix Elixir
  • asparaginase -
    An enzyme used in the treatment of cancer. It belongs to the family of drugs called antineoplastics.
  • aspartate transaminase -
    An enzyme found in the liver, heart, and other tissues. A high level of aspartate transaminase released into the blood may be a sign of liver or heart damage, cancer, or other diseases. Also called serum glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase or SGOT.
  • aspergillosis -
    An infectious fungal disease that occurs most often in the skin, ears, nasal sinuses, and lungs of people with suppressed immune systems.
  • Aspergillus -
    A family of fungi commonly found in soil. Certain types may cause disease, especially in people who have suppressed immune systems.
  • Aspergum
  • Asphalt Paving &
  • aspirate - AS-pi-rit
    Fluid withdrawn from a lump (often a cyst) or a nipple.
  • aspiration - as-per-AY-shun
    Removal of fluid or tissue through a needle. Also, the accidental breathing in of food or fluid into the lungs.
  • Aspiration pneumonia
    Aspiration pneumonia is bronchopneumonia that develops due to the entrance of foreign materials that enter the bronchial tree, usually oral or gastric contents (including food, saliva, or nasal secretions). ...
  • aspirin -
    A drug that reduces pain, fever, inflammation, and blood clotting. Aspirin belongs to the family of drugs called nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents. It is also being studied in cancer prevention.
  • Aspirin and Carisoprodol
  • Aspirin and Extended-Release Dipyridamole
  • Aspirin and Oxycodone
  • Aspirin Gum
  • Aspirin Rectal
  • Aspirin, Butalbital, and Caffeine
  • Aspirin, Butalbital, Caffeine and Codeine
  • assay - AS-say
    A laboratory test to find and measure the amount of a specific substance.
  • Assistive Devices
    technical tools and devices such as alphabet boards, text telephones, or text-to-speech conversion software used to assist people with physical or emotional disorders in performing certain actions, tasks, and activities.
  • Assistive Technology
    Assistive Technology (AT) is a generic term that includes assistive, adaptive, and rehabilitative devices and the process used in selecting, locating, and using them. AT promotes greater independence for people with disabilities by enabling them to use items that they were formerly unable to use by providing enhancements or methods of using the technology. ...
  • AST
    AST is a three-letter abbreviation that stands for a number of different things.
  • Astelin
  • Astemizole
  • asthenia -
    Weakness; lack of energy and strength.
  • Asthma - pediatric
  • Asthma in Children
  • Asthma Medications
  • Astigmatism
    Astigmatism is a refraction error of the eye characterized by an aspherical cornea in which one axis of corneal steepness is greater than the perpendicular axis. Astigmatism causes difficulties in seeing fine detail, and can be often corrected by glasses with a cylindrical lens (i.e. a lens that has different radii of curvature in different planes), contact lenses, or refractive surgery.
  • Astragalus
    Astragalus is a large genus of herbs, belonging to the legume family Fabaceae.
  • Astragalus Membranaceus
  • Astramorph
  • astrocyte - AS-troe-site
    A type of cell found in the brain and spinal cord. An astrocyte is a small, star-shaped glial cell (a cell that surrounds and supports nerve cells).
  • astrocytoma - as-troe-sye-TOE-ma
    A tumor that begins in the brain or spinal cord in small, star-shaped cells called astrocytes.
  • Astrocytoma, Childhood Cerebral
  • Astrology
    Astrology (from Greek: αστρολογία = άστρον, astron, "star" + λόγος, logos, "word") is any of several traditions or systems in which knowledge of the apparent positions of celestial bodies is held to be useful in understanding, interpreting, and organizing knowledge about reality and human existence on earth. ...
  • asymmetry -
    Lack or absence of balanced proportions between parts of a thing.
  • asymptomatic -
    Having no signs or symptoms of disease.
  • Asymptomatic bacteriuria
  • Asymptomatic HIV infection
  • At Home Workout
  • At Work Toners
  • At Work!
    Unequal treatment of persons, whether through hiring or employment rules or through variation of the conditions of employment, because of sex, age, marital status, race, creed, union membership, or other activities. In many cases discrimination is an unfair labour practice under federal or provincial laws.
  • Atacand HCT
  • atamestane -
    A substance that is being studied in the treatment of cancer. Atamestane blocks the production of the hormone estrogen in the body. It belongs to the family of drugs called antiestrogens.
  • Atarax
    Hydroxyzine is a piperazine derivative that is used as an antihistamine (especially for pruritus), anti-emetic, and anxiolytic drug. It can also be used as an adjunct to pre- and post-operative medication and it also possesses a weak analgesic effect. Hydroxyzine is sold under brand names such as Atarax, Serecid and Vistaril.
  • Atarax Syrup
  • ataxia -
    Loss of muscle coordination.
  • Ataxia - telangiectasia
    Ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) (Boder-Sedgwick syndrome or Louis-Bar syndromeJames, William; Berger, Timothy; Elston, Dirk (2005). ...
  • ataxia-telangiectasia -
    A rare, inherited, progressive, degenerative disease of childhood that causes loss of muscle control, a weakened immune system, and an increased risk of cancer.
  • ataxic gait - ah-TAK-sik
    Awkward, uncoordinated walking.
  • atelectasis - at-uh-LEK-tuh-sis
    Failure of the lung to expand (inflate) completely. This may be caused by a blocked airway, a tumor, general anesthesia, pneumonia or other lung infections, lung disease, or long-term bedrest with shallow breathing. Sometimes called a collapsed lung.
  • Atelosteogenesis, type 2
    Atelosteogenesis, type 2 is a severe disorder of cartilage and bone development. Infants born with this condition have very short arms and legs, a narrow chest, and a prominent, rounded abdomen. This disorder is also characterized by an opening in the roof of the mouth (cleft palate), distinctive facial features, an inward- and downward-turning foot (clubfoot), and unusually positioned thumbs (hitchhiker thumbs). The signs and symptoms of atelosteogenesis, type 2 are similar to those of another skeletal disorder called diastrophic dysplasia. Atelosteogenesis, type 2 tends to be more severe, however. Infants with this disorder are usually stillborn or die shortly after birth from respiratory failure. Some affected infants have survived for a time with intensive medical support.
  • Atenolol
    Atenolol is a drug belonging to the group of beta blockers, a class of drugs used primarily in cardiovascular diseases (hypertension, coronary heart disease, arrhythmias). It is also used in other conditions including anxiety and hyperthyroidism.
  • Atenolol and Chlorthalidone
  • Atenolol Injection
  • Atgam
  • Atheroembolic renal disease
  • Athlete's Foot
    Athlete's foot is a fungal infection of the skin, usually between the toes, caused by parasitic fungi.
  • Athlete//'s foot
  • Athletes
    Athletics, also known as track and field or track and field athletics, is a collection of sport events. The word is derived from the Greek word "athlos" meaning "contest". It is a collection of sport events, which can roughly be divided into running, throwing, and jumping.
  • athymic, nude mouse -
    A type of laboratory mouse that is hairless, lacks a normal thymus gland, and has a defective immune system because of a genetic mutation. Athymic, nude mice are often used in cancer research because they do not reject tumor cells, from mice or other species.
  • Ativan Injection
  • Atkins Advises to Limit Saturated Fat Intake In The Diets
  • Atkins Diet
    The Atkins Nutritional Approach, popularly known as the Atkins Diet or just Atkins, is a popular but controversial high-protein, high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet. It was popularized by Dr. Robert Atkins (1930-2003) in a series of books, starting with Dr. Atkins' Diet Revolution in 1972. It has been astonishingly popular in recent times because of his revised book, Dr. Atkins' New Diet Revolution, in which he updated some of his ideas but remained faithful to the original concepts.
  • ATLL -
    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma. An aggressive (rapidly progressing) type of T-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma caused by the human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1). It is marked by bone and skin lesions, high calcium levels, and enlarged lymph nodes, spleen and liver.
  • Atovaquone and Proguanil
  • Atovaquone Oral Suspension
  • ATP -
    Adenosine triphosphate. A substance present in all living cells that provides energy for many metabolic processes and is involved in making RNA. ATP made in the laboratory is being studied in patients with advanced solid tumors to see if it can decrease weight loss and improve muscle strength.
  • Atracurium
  • atrasentan -
    A substance that is being studied in the treatment of cancer. It belongs to the family of drugs called endothelin-1 protein receptor antagonists.
  • Atrial fibrillation/flutter
  • Atrial Flutter
    Atrial flutter is an abnormal heart rhythm that occurs in the atria of the heart. When it first occurs, it is usually associated with a fast heart ...
  • Atrial myxoma
    An atrial myxoma is a non-cancerous tumor in the upper left or right side of the heart. It grows on the wall (atrial septum) that separates the ...
  • Atrial Septal Defect
    An atrial septal defect (ASD) is a group of congenital heart diseases that involve the inter-atrial septum of the heart. The inter-atrial septum is the tissue that separates the right and left atria from each other. Without this septum, or if there is a defect in this septum, it is possible for blood to travel from the left side of the heart to the right side of the heart, or the other way around.
  • Atrial Tachycardia
    Atrial tachycardia is a type of supraventricular tachycardia characterized by a clear P wave before the QRS complex, indicating a lack of direct ...
  • Atropa mandragora
  • AtroPen
  • Atrophic vaginitis
    Atrophic vaginitis (also known as vaginal atrophy or urogenital atrophy) is an inflammation of the vagina (and the outer urinary tract) due to the ...
  • Atrophy
    Atrophy is the partial or complete wasting away of a part of the body. Causes of atrophy include poor nourishment, poor circulation, loss of hormonal support, loss of nerve supply to the target organ, disuse or lack of exercise or disease intrinsic to the tissue itself. ...
  • Atropine
    Atropine is an alkaloid extracted from the deadly nightshade (Atropa belladonna) and other plants of the family Solanaceae. It is a secondary metabolite of these plants and serves as a drug with a wide variety of effects.
  • Atropine Auto-Injection
  • Atropine Care
  • Atropine Injection
  • Atropine Ophthalmic
  • Atropine Oral
  • Atropine, Hyoscyamine, Phenobarbital, and Scopolamine Elixir
  • Atropine, Hyoscyamine, Phenobarbital, and Scopolamine Oral
  • Atropisol
  • Atrovent
    ipratropium bromide: an inhaled bronchodilator (trade name Atrovent)
  • Atrovent nasal
  • Attention Deficit Disorders
  • attenuated -
    Weakened or thinned. Attenuated strains of disease-causing bacteria and viruses are often used as vaccines. The weakened strains are used as vaccines because they stimulate a protective immune response while causing no disease or only mild disease in the person receiving the vaccine.
  • Atuss EX
  • Atuss HD
  • Atuss MS Liquid
  • Atuss-HC
  • atypical hyperplasia - AY-TIP-i-kul hy-per-PLAY-zha
    A benign (noncancerous) condition in which cells look abnormal under a microscope and are increased in number.
  • Atypical pneumonia
    Atypical pneumonia is a term used to describe a form of pneumonia not caused by one of the more traditional pathogens.
  • atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor -
    ATT/RHT or AT/RT. An aggressive cancer of the central nervous system, kidney, or liver that occurs in very young children.
  • Audiovisual Materials
    Non-book materials such as filmstrips, recordings, films, records, video and audio cassettes, and compact discs (CDs).
  • Auditory Neuropathy
    Auditory neuropathy (AN) is a form of hearing loss in which the cochlea's hair cells are present and functional, but the sound signal does not reach the auditory nerve and brain properly. There are several possible causes of auditory neuropathy. AN is likely under-diagnosed due to the difficult of distinguishing AN from hearing loss caused damage to the hair cells.
  • Auditory Processing Disorder in Children
  • Augentrostkraut
  • Augmentin
    Co-amoxiclav is the British Approved Name, in the British Pharmacopoeia, for the combination antibiotic containing amoxicillin and clavulanic acid. This name, unlike co-trimoxazole, has not been widely adopted internationally and the combination product is usually referred to by various names such as amoxicillin with clavulanic acid or amoxicillin+clavulanate or simply by the trade name. Co-amoxiclav is currently marketed by GlaxoSmithKline under the trade name Augmentin®.
  • Augmentin ES-600
  • Augmentin Oral Suspension
  • Augmentin XR
  • augmerosen -
    A drug that may kill cancer cells by blocking the production of a protein that makes cancer cells live longer. Also called bcl-2 antisense oligodeoxynucleotide G3139 and oblimersen.
  • Auralgan Ear Drops
  • Auranofin
  • Auriculotherapy
    Auriculotherapy is an east-west hybrid medical system, founded by Dr. Paul Nogier of France in the 1940s.
  • Aurodex Ear Drops
  • Aurothioglucose Injection
  • Auroto Otic
  • Australia
    The Commonwealth of Australia is the sixth-largest country in the world by area. A part of Australasia, it includes the mainland and a number of islands, the largest of which is Tasmania. Australia has been inhabited for about 50,000 years, originally by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. Eastern Australia was claimed by the British in 1770, and officially settled as a British colony on January 26, 1788. ...
  • Australia and the South Pacific
  • Australian fever tree
  • Austria
    The Republic of Austria (German: Republik Österreich) is a landlocked country in the heart of Europe. It borders Germany and the Czech Republic to the north, Slovakia and Hungary to the east, Slovenia and Italy to the south, and Switzerland and Liechtenstein to the west.
  • Autism and Communication
  • Autism Spectrum Disorders
    a group of pervasive developmental disorders; diagnostic criteria include communication problems, ritualistic behaviors and inappropriate social interaction
  • Auto-Immune
    Autoimmune diseases arise from an overactive immune response of the body against substances and tissues normally present in the body. Today there are more than 40 human diseases classified as either definite or probable autoimmune diseases and they affect 5-7% of the population. Almost all autoimmune diseases appear without warning or apparent cause and most patients suffer from fatigue.
  • Auto-Immune Disorders
  • Autoantibodies
    Abnormal antibodies produced against the body's own tissues.
  • autoclave-resistant factor -
    A substance found in soybeans that may slow down or stop the spread of cancer. This substance does not break down in an autoclave (a device that uses high-pressure steam to kill microorganisms and clean medical equipment).
  • Autogenic Therapy
    training patients in self-induced relaxation
  • Autogenic Training
    Autogenic training is a term for a relaxation technique developed by the German psychiatrist Johannes Schultz first published in 1932. It usually involves a series of sessions in which the patients learn to relax their limbs, heart, and breathing. The goal is to induce a pleasant, warm feeling throughout most of the body but induce a feeling of coolness in the forehead. The technique is used against stress-induced psychosomatic disorders.
  • autoimmune disease -
    A condition in which the body recognizes its own tissues as foreign and directs an immune response against them.
  • Autoimmune Diseases
    Autoimmune diseases arise from an overactive immune response of the body against substances and tissues normally present in the body. Today there are more than 40 human diseases classified as either definite or probable autoimmune diseases and they affect 5-7% of the population. Almost all autoimmune diseases appear without warning or apparent cause and most patients suffer from fatigue.
  • Autoimmune Diseases (General)
    Autoimmune diseases arise from an overactive immune response of the body against substances and tissues normally present in the body. Today there are more than 40 human diseases classified as either definite or probable autoimmune diseases and they affect 5-7% of the population. Almost all autoimmune diseases appear without warning or apparent cause and most patients suffer from fatigue.
  • Autoimmune Diseases And Disorders
  • Autoimmune Disorders
    Autoimmune diseases arise from an overactive immune response of the body against substances and tissues normally present in the body. Today there are more than 40 human diseases classified as either definite or probable autoimmune diseases and they affect 5-7% of the population. Almost all autoimmune diseases appear without warning or apparent cause and most patients suffer from fatigue.
  • Autoimmune Hepatitis
    liver disease caused when the body's immune system destroys liver cells for no known reason.
  • Autoimmune Liver Disease
  • Autoimmune Thrombocytopenia Purpura
  • autologous - aw-TAHL-o-gus
    Taken from an individual's own tissues, cells, or DNA.
  • Autologous Blood Transfusion
    Infusion of blood or blood products donated by another person into an artery or vein. For surgery, the blood is usually predonated. In general, autologous blood transfusion is much safer than allogeneic blood transfusion.
  • autologous bone marrow -
    In transplantation, refers to a person's own bone marrow. Bone marrow is the soft, sponge-like tissue in the center of most large bones that produces white blood cells, red blood cells, and platelets.
  • autologous bone marrow transplantation - aw-TAHL-o-gus
    A procedure in which bone marrow is removed from a person, stored, and then given back to the person after intensive treatment.
  • autologous lymphocyte -
    In transplantation, refers to a person’s own white blood cells. Lymphocytes have a number of roles in the immune system, including the production of antibodies and other substances that fight infection and disease.
  • autologous stem cell transplantation - aw-TAHL-o-gus
    A procedure in which stem cells (cells from which all blood cells develop) are removed, stored, and then given back to the same person.
  • autologous tumor cell -
    A cancer cell from an individual's own tumor.
  • Automobile Safety
  • Autonomic hyperreflexia
    Autonomic dysreflexia,"AD" or "autonomic hyperreflexia" is a condition characterized by a massive sympathetic discharge that can occur in ...
  • Autonomic Nervous System Disorders
  • Autonomic neuropathy
    Autonomic neuropathy is a disease of the non-voluntary, non-sensory nervous system affecting mostly the internal organs such as the bladder muscles, the cardiovascular system, the digestive tract, and the genital organs. These nerves are not under a person's conscious control and function automatically. They do not run through the spinal cord. Also called visceral neuropathy. Most commonly autonomic neuropathy is seen in persons with long-standing diabetes mellitus type 1 and 2. ...
  • Autoplex T
  • Autosuggestion
    Autosuggestion is a process by which an individual trains the subconscious mind to believe something, or systematically schematizes the person's own mental associations, usually for a given purpose. This is accomplished through self-hypnosis methods or repetitive, constant self-affirmations, and may be seen as a form of self-induced brainwashing. The acceptance of autosuggestion may be quickened through mental visualization of that which the individual would like to believe. ...
  • Avage cream
  • Avalide
  • Avandamet
  • Avapro
    Irbesartan is an angiotensin II receptor antagonist used mainly for the treatment of hypertension. Irbesartan was discovered by Sanofi Research (now part of Sanofi-Aventis). It is jointly marketed by Sanofi-Aventis and Bristol-Myers Squibb under the trade names Aprovel, Karvea, and Avapro.
  • Avascular Necrosis
    Avascular necrosis is a disease resulting from the temporary or permanent loss of the blood supply to the bones. Without blood, the bone tissue dies and causes the bone to collapse. If the process involves the bones near a joint, it often leads to collapse of the joint surface. This disease also is known as osteonecrosis, aseptic necrosis, and ischemic bone necrosis.
  • Avastin -
    A monoclonal antibody used in the treatment of colorectal cancer that has spread. It is also being studied in the treatment of other types of cancer. It may prevent the growth of new blood vessels from surrounding tissue to a solid tumor. Also called bevacizumab.
  • Aveeno
    Aveeno is a large manufacturer of skin care products in the United States and is a subsidiary of American consumer goods and pharmaceutical ...
  • Avelox I.V.
  • Aventyl Oral Solution
  • Aviane
  • Aviation, Commercial
  • Avinza
  • Avita
    Biomedical manufacturer
  • Avoidant personality disorder
    Avoidant personality disorder (sometimes abbreviated APD or AvPD) is a personality disorder characterised by a pervasive pattern of social inhibition, feelings of inadequacy, and extreme sensitivity to negative evaluation. People with avoidant personality disorder often consider themselves to be socially inept or personally unappealing, and avoid social interaction for fear of being ridiculed or humiliated.
  • Avonex
    Interferon beta-1a is a drug in the interferon family used to treat multiple sclerosis. It is the pioneering treatment for multiple sclerosis with, as of 2005, 16 years of data demonstrating its safety and efficacy. While these drugs improve certain diagnostic test results, many patients report no perceived improvement, along with serious side-effects that substantially reduce quality of life. ...
  • Awa
    AWA is a three-letter abbreviation for
  • Axid AR
  • Axid Capsules
  • axilla - ak-SIL-a
    The underarm or armpit.
  • axillary - AK-sil-air-ee
    Pertaining to the armpit area, including the lymph nodes that are located there.
  • axillary dissection - AK-suh-LAIR-ee dis-EK-shun
    Surgery to remove lymph nodes found in the armpit region. Also called axillary lymph node dissection.
  • axillary lymph node - AK-suh-LAIR-ee
    A lymph node in the armpit region that drains lymph channels from the breast.
  • axillary lymph node dissection - AK-suh-LAIR-ee…dis-EK-shun
    Surgery to remove lymph nodes found in the armpit region. Also called axillary dissection.
  • Axillary nerve dysfunction
    Axillary nerve dysfunction is a general term that refers to any type of dysfunction of the axillary nerve. ...
  • Axokine
    A survival factor. Axokine is a genetically altered form of the survival factor known as ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF). Survival factors are naturally-occurring substances that promote the health of nerve cells such as photoreceptors. Axokine has delayed retinal degeneration in a variety of animal models with retinal degeneration.
  • Axotal
  • Aygestin
  • Ayurveda
    Ayurveda: "This comprehensive system of medicine, developed in India over 2,000 years ago, places equal emphasis on body, mind, and spirit. The goal is to restore the natural harmony of the individual. An Ayurvedic doctor identifies an individual's constitution or overall health profile by ascertaining the patient's metabolic body type (Vata, Pitta, or Kapha) through a series of personal history questions. The patient's constitution then becomes the foundation of a specific treatment plan designed to guide the individual back into harmony with his or her environment. This plan may include dietary changes, exercise, yoga, meditation, massage, herbal tonics, and other remedies."
  • Ayurvedic Medicine
    Ayurveda (आयुर्वेद Sanskrit: ayu—life; veda—knowledge of) or ayurvedic medicine is a more than 2,000 year old comprehensive system of medicine based on a holistic approach rooted in Vedic culture. Its conspicuous use of the word veda, or knowledge, reveals its role in early Hinduism and describes its hallowed place in India. Ayurveda also had a tradition of surgery. ...
  • Ayurvedic Remedies
  • Ayurvedic Treatment
  • azacitidine -
    An anticancer drug that belongs to the family of drugs called antimetabolites.
  • Azacitidine Injection
  • Azactam
    aztreonam: an antibiotic (trade name Azactam) used against severe infections; has minimal side effects
  • Azathioprine
    Azathioprine is a chemotherapy drug, now rarely used for chemotherapy but more for immunosuppression in organ transplantation and autoimmune disease such as rheumatoid arthritis or Crohn's disease. It is a pro-drug, converted in the body to the active metabolite 6-mercaptopurine.
  • Azathioprine Injection
  • Azelaic Acid Topical
  • Azelastine Eyedrops
  • Azelastine Nasal Spray
  • Azelex
  • Azerbaijan
    Azerbaijan (Azerbaijani: Azərbaycan) is a country in the Caucasus, at the crossroads of Europe and Southwest Asia, with an eastern coast on the Caspian Sea. It has frontiers with Russia in the north, Georgia in the northwest, Armenia in the west, and Iran in the south. The Nakhichevan Autonomous Republic (an exclave of Azerbaijan) borders Armenia to the north and east, Iran to the south and west, and Turkey to the northwest.
  • Azidothymidine Capsule
  • Azidothymidine Injection
  • Azithromycin
    Azithromycin is the first macrolide antibiotic belonging to the azalide group. Azithromycin is derived from erythromycin by adding a nitrogen atom into the lactone ring of erythromycin A, thus making lactone ring 15-membered. Azithromycin is sold under the brand name of Zithromax and Sumamed, and is one of the world's best selling antibiotics. Azithromycin is used for the treatment of respiratory tract, soft-tissue and genitourinary infections.
  • Azithromycin Injection
  • Azithromycin Oral Suspension
  • Azmacort
  • Azores
    The Azores (Portuguese: Açores) are an archipelago of Portuguese islands in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean, about 1,500 km from Lisbon and about 3,900 km from the east coast of North America.
  • azoxymethane -
    A substance that is used in cancer research to cause colon tumors in laboratory animals. This is done to test new diets, drugs, and procedures for use in cancer prevention and treatment.
  • AZQ -
    Diaziquone. An anticancer drug that is able to cross the blood-brain barrier and kill cancer cells in the central nervous system.
  • AZT -
    A drug that inhibits the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) that causes AIDS. Also called zidovudine.
  • AZT Capsule
  • AZT Injection
  • AZT Oral Syrup
  • Aztreonam
    Aztreonam (trade name Azactam) is a synthetic monocyclic beta-lactam antibiotic (a monobactam) originally isolated from Chromobacterium violaceum. ...
  • Aztreonam Injection
  • Azucacaa
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